Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Telmatobiidae

Scientific Name: Telmatobius brevipes
Species Authority: Vellard, 1951
Common Name(s):
English Huahachuco Water Frog
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2014. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6 (27 January 2014). New York, USA. Available at: (Accessed: 27 January 2014).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered A3e ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Javier Icochea, Ulrich Sinsch, Edgar Lehr, Wilfredo Arizabal, Jesús Córdova-Santa Gadea
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Listed as Endangered because of a population decline, projected to be more than 50% over the next 10 years, inferred from the potential impact of chytridiomycosis on populations of this species.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is known from the Cordillera Occidental of northern Perú, in the departments of Cajamarca and La Libertad, where it has been collected at elevations of between 2,000 and 3,520m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Its population status is not known.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It is a riparian semi-aquatic species, and can be found under rocks along streams in cloud forest to páramo; it is also present in irrigation ditches in cultivated areas. It is presumed to be a stream breeder.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There is little information available on its threats, although water pollution might be a localized threat. Populations of other species in the genus living at high elevations are very susceptible to infection with chytridiomycosis. The pathogen has yet to be reported from Telmatobius brevipes, but congeners nearby in Ecuador have disappeared, and so this species would appear to be seriously at risk.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Survey work is needed to establish the population status of this species, and it requires careful population monitoring, particularly given the risk of chytridiomycosis. It is not known to be present in any protected areas.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability: Suitable  
3. Shrubland -> 3.7. Shrubland - Subtropical/Tropical High Altitude
suitability: Suitable  
4. Grassland -> 4.7. Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical High Altitude
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.1. Artificial/Terrestrial - Arable Land
suitability: Suitable  
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.9. Artificial/Aquatic - Canals and Drainage Channels, Ditches
suitability: Suitable  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management
3. Species management -> 3.2. Species recovery
3. Species management -> 3.4. Ex-situ conservation -> 3.4.1. Captive breeding/artificial propagation

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
8. Invasive & other problematic species & genes -> 8.1. Invasive non-native/alien species -> 8.1.2. Named species (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis)
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.4. Type Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

IUCN. 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 23 November 2004.

Vellard, J. 1951. Estudios sobre batrachios andinos. I. El grupo Telmatobius y formas afines. Memorias del Museo de Histoire Natural "Javier Prado": 1-89.

Wiens, J.J. 1993. Systematics of the leptodactylid frog genus Telmatobius in the Andes of northern Peru. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural History of the University of Kansas: 1-76.

Citation: Javier Icochea, Ulrich Sinsch, Edgar Lehr, Wilfredo Arizabal, Jesús Córdova-Santa Gadea. 2004. Telmatobius brevipes. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T57327A11621958. . Downloaded on 09 October 2015.
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