Map_thumbnail_large_font

Telmatobius bolivianus 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_onStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Telmatobiidae

Scientific Name: Telmatobius bolivianus
Species Authority: Parker, 1940
Synonym(s):
Telmatobius ifornoi Lavilla and Ergueta Sandoval, 1999
Taxonomic Notes: This species was formerly considered to be a synonym of Telmatobius marmoratus (Vellard 1970). It was resurrected as a full species by De la Riva et al. (2000). T. ifornoi is included as a synonym of this species, following De la Riva (2005).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Claudia Cortez, Steffen Reichle, Ignacio De la Riva, Jörn Köhler
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Justification:
Listed as Near Threatened since although its Extent of Occurrence is probably less than 5,000 km2 and its habitat might be declining, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable, it probably occurs in more than ten locations, and its range is probably not severely fragmented.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is known only from the Yungas forests of La Paz Department, Bolivia, from 2,000-3,000m asl. Telmatobius ifornoi, known only from Chuspipata, in Nor Yungas Province, La Paz Department, at 3,050m asl, is now considered to be a synonym (Lavilla and Ergueta 1999).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Bolivia, Plurinational States of
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This is the most common and widespread Telmatobius species in Bolivia.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It is an aquatic species that occurs in fast-flowing rivers and streams in cloud forests and Yungas forest. It is often present in the muddy bottoms of streams. There is no information on its breeding biology, though it presumably takes place by larval development in streams.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It is affected by ongoing habitat loss and degradation, as a result of logging and agricultural expansion. It is also threatened by water pollution and aquaculture. Despite these threats its populations appear to be currently stable. However, chytridiomycosis is a potential future threat that could cause serious declines, but this has not yet been confirmed in this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in Parque Nacional y Área Natural de Manejo Integrado Cotapata, and Área Natural de Manejo Integrado Nacional Apolobamba. Given the possible threat of chytridiomycosis, this species should be monitored closely.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management
3. Species management -> 3.4. Ex-situ conservation -> 3.4.1. Captive breeding/artificial propagation

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.4. Marine & freshwater aquaculture -> 2.4.3. Scale Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

3. Energy production & mining -> 3.2. Mining & quarrying
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

8. Invasive & other problematic species & genes -> 8.1. Invasive non-native/alien species -> 8.1.2. Named species (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis)
♦ timing: Future    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

9. Pollution -> 9.2. Industrial & military effluents -> 9.2.3. Type Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.4. Type Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

De la Riva, I. 2005. Bolivian frogs of the genus Telmatobius: synopsis, taxonomic problems and description of a new species. Monografias de Herpetologia special issue "Estudios sobre las ranas andinas de los generos Telmatobius y Batrachophrynus (Anura: Leptodactylidae) 7: 65-101.

De la Riva, I., Köhler, J., Lötters, S. and Reichle, S. 2000. Ten years of research on Bolivian amphibians: updated checklist, distribution, taxonomic problems, literature and iconography. Revista Espanola de Herpetologia: 19-164.

IUCN. 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. www.iucnredlist.org. Downloaded on 23 November 2004.

Lavilla, E. and Ergueta, P. 1995. Una nueva especie de Telmatobius (Anura, Leptodactylidae) de la ceja de montaña de La Paz (Bolivia). Alytes: 45-51.

Lavilla, E. and Ergueta, P. 1999. A new Bolivian species of the genus Telmatobius (Anura: Leptodactylidae) with a humeral spine. Amphibia-Reptilia: 55-64.

Vellard, J. 1970. Contribución al estudio de los batracios andinos. Revista Museo Argentino Ciencias Naturales “Bernardino Rivadavia” Zoología: 21.


Citation: Claudia Cortez, Steffen Reichle, Ignacio De la Riva, Jörn Köhler. 2004. Telmatobius bolivianus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T57326A11621673. . Downloaded on 26 June 2016.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided