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Eleutherodactylus melacara 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Eleutherodactylidae

Scientific Name: Eleutherodactylus melacara Hedges, Estrada and Thomas, 1992
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2014. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6 (27 January 2014). New York, USA. Available at: http://research.amnh.org/herpetology/amphibia/index.html. (Accessed: 27 January 2014).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Blair Hedges, Luis Díaz
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Justification:
Listed as Endangered because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 5,000 km2 and Area of Occupancy less than 500km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat in southeastern Cuba.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species has a restricted range in Pico Turquino and Santiago de Cuba Province, Cuba, where it ranges from 845-1,974m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Cuba
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It is moderately common in suitable habitat.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It is arboreal in closed moist forests. The species breeds in and lays its eggs in bromeliads, and breeds by direct development.
Systems:Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The major threat is habitat destruction, which is taking place as a result of deforestation for agricultural activities, woodcutting, disturbance from tourists, and infrastructure development for human settlement.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in Parque Nacional Turquino and Parque Nacional La Bayamesa, but there is no management of these areas for conservation, and the habitat continues to be destroyed. As such, there is a need for improved and strengthened management of these existing protected areas.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability:Suitable  
1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability:Suitable  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management
2. Land/water management -> 2.3. Habitat & natural process restoration

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.1. Housing & urban areas
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.3. Tourism & recreation areas
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

6. Human intrusions & disturbance -> 6.1. Recreational activities
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

Centro Nacional de Areas Protegidas (CNAP). 2002. Sistema Nacional de Areas Protegidas. Cuba. Plan 2003-2008. CNAP, Sevilla, Spain.

Hedges, S.B. 1993. Global amphibian declines: a perspective from the Caribbean. Biodiversity and Conservation 2(3): 290-303.

Hedges, S.B. 1999. Distribution of amphibians in the West Indies. In: W.E. Duellman (ed.), Patterns of Distribution of Amphibians. A Global Perspective, pp. 211-254. The Johns Hopkins Press, Baltimore, Maryland.

Hedges, S.B. 2001. Caribherp: database of West Indian amphibians and reptiles (http://www.caribherp.net). Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA.

Hedges, S.B., Estrada, A.R. and Thomas, R. 1992. Three new species of Eleutherodactylus from eastern Cuba, with notes on vocalizations of other species (Anura, Leptodactylidae). Herpetological Monographs: 68-83.

Henderson, R.W. and Powell, R. 1999. West Indian herpetoecology. In: B.I. Crother (ed.), Caribbean Amphibians and Reptiles, pp. 223-226. Academic Press, San Diego, California.

Henderson, R.W. and Powell, R. 2001. Responses by the West Indian herpetofauna to human-influenced resources. Caribbean Journal of Science 37: 41-54.

IUCN. 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 23 November 2004).

Schwartz, A. and Henderson, R.W. 1991. Amphibians and Reptiles of the West Indies: Descriptions, Distributions and Natural History. University of Florida Press, Gainesville, Florida.


Citation: Blair Hedges, Luis Díaz. 2004. Eleutherodactylus melacara. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T56754A11531680. . Downloaded on 11 December 2017.
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