Map_thumbnail_large_font

Halophila australis 

Scope: Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Translate page into:

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Plantae Tracheophyta Liliopsida Hydrocharitales Hydrocharitaceae

Scientific Name: Halophila australis
Species Authority: Doty & B.C.Stone
Common Name(s):
English Species Code: Ha
Taxonomic Notes: This species is often difficult to distinguish from H. ovalis.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2007-10-17
Assessor(s): Short, F.T., Carruthers, T.J.R., Waycott, M., Kendrick, G.A., Fourqurean, J.W., Callabine, A., Kenworthy, W.J. & Dennison, W.C.
Reviewer(s): Livingstone, S., Harwell, H. & Carpenter, K.E.
Justification:
This species is listed as Least Concern as there are no known major threats causing declines in the current range. There are, however, taxonomic issues with this species due to the difficulties in distinguishing it from H. ovalis.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Halophila australis is endemic to Australia, occurring along the southern coast from Perth to Victoria and in northern Tasmania.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Australia
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Indian Ocean – eastern; Pacific – southwest
Additional data:
Lower depth limit (metres):15
Upper depth limit (metres):1
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:There is no specific population information for H. australis, but the population trend is thought to be stable. This species is difficult to distinguish from H. ovalis except when flowering.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Halophila australis is a temperate species growing in the southern seas of Australia, with rapid growth, high turn-over and wide ecological range. It is considered a pioneering species.
Systems:Marine
Generation Length (years):4

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Localized threats in the region are coastal development from industry, pipelines, and communication cables, mining and dredging, eutrophication, aquaculture, farming, direct physical damage by recreational and commercial boating activities, and to some extent trawling activities. Light reduction due to high sediment loads in water is also a threat to this species (Green and Short 2003).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Halophila australis is protected by the Fisheries Act, National Park, and Marine Park Acts (Green and Short 2003).

Classifications [top]

9. Marine Neritic -> 9.4. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Sandy
suitability:Suitable  
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.5. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Sandy-Mud
suitability:Suitable  
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.9. Marine Neritic - Seagrass (Submerged)
suitability:Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.2. Commercial & industrial areas
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.4. Marine & freshwater aquaculture -> 2.4.3. Scale Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

5. Biological resource use -> 5.4. Fishing & harvesting aquatic resources -> 5.4.4. Unintentional effects: (large scale) [harvest]
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

6. Human intrusions & disturbance -> 6.1. Recreational activities
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

6. Human intrusions & disturbance -> 6.3. Work & other activities
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.1. Nutrient loads
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.2. Soil erosion, sedimentation
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

Bibliography [top]

Green, E.P. and Short, F.T. 2003. World Atlas of Seagrasses. University of California Press, Berkeley.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.3). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 2 September 2010).

Waycott, M. 1995. Assessment of genetic variation and clonality in the seagrass Posidonia australis using RAPD and allozyme analysis. Marine Ecology Progress Series 116: 289-295.

Waycott, M. and Sampson, J.F. 1997. The mating system of a hydrophilous angiosperm Posidonia australis (Posidoniaceae). American Journal of Botany 84: 621-625.

Waycott, M., James, S.H. and Walker, D.I. 1997. Genetic variation within and between populations of Posidonia australis, a hydrophilous, clonal seagrass. Heredity 79: 408-417.


Citation: Short, F.T., Carruthers, T.J.R., Waycott, M., Kendrick, G.A., Fourqurean, J.W., Callabine, A., Kenworthy, W.J. & Dennison, W.C. 2010. Halophila australis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T173371A7001541. . Downloaded on 26 September 2016.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided