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Hylaeamys oniscus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_onStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Rodentia Cricetidae

Scientific Name: Hylaeamys oniscus (Thomas, 1904)
Common Name(s):
English Sowbug Rice Rat
Synonym(s):
Oryzomys oniscus Thomas, 1904
Taxonomic Notes: Oryzomys is a generic synonym (Weksler et al. 2006). This species is monotypic (Percequillo 2015).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2017
Date Assessed: 2016-07-19
Assessor(s): Percequillo, A. & Roach, N.
Reviewer(s): Amori, G.
Contributor(s): Langguth, A.
Justification:
This species is listed as Near Threatened because while its extent of occurrence (EOO) is greater than 90,000 km², its distribution is severely fragmented (its area of occupancy may be close to meeting the criterion B2 threshold), it is known from fewer than ten locations, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat, though it is common where it occurs.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to the northeastern Atlantic Forest of Brazil. All known localities have been reported north of the Rio São Francisco in the states of Alagoas, Pernambuco, and Paraíba (Percequillo 2015). The area where this species occurs has experienced intense deforestation and most habitats occur only in fragmented patches (T. Lacher pers. comm).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Brazil
Additional data:
Number of Locations:4
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This species is locally common. No recent population studies have been conducted. There is no information available, but sampling conducted by Brennand and Percequillo in 2008 in Alagoas, during the rainy season, recovered this species as the most abundant small mammal (Percequillo pers. comm).
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Yes

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species has not been captured outside of forested areas and is currently confined to mosaics of severely fragmented remaining forested areas within a limited range.
Systems:Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The major threats are habitat destruction, fragmentation and deforestation for sugar cane plantations. This species has a limited range in an area where much of the forest has been converted to agriculture and livestock.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species occurs in several protected areas, including Biological Reserve Saltinho.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability:Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.3. Agro-industry farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.2. Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.3. Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats

Bibliography [top]

Brennand, P.GG., Languuth, A. and Percequillo, A.R. 2013. The genus Hylaeamys Weksler, Percequillo, and Voss 2006 (Rodentia: Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest: geographic variation and species definition. Journal of Mammalogy 94(6): 1346-1363.

Eisenberg, J.F. and Redford, K.H. 1999. Mammals of the Neotropics. The Central Neotropics. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, USA.

IUCN. 2017. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2017-2. Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 14 September 2017).

Musser, G.G. and Carleton, M.D. 2005. Superfamily Muroidea. In: D.E. Wilson and D.A. Reeder (eds), Mammal Species of the World: a geographic and taxonomic reference, pp. 894-1531. The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, USA.

Percequillo, A.R. 2015. Genus Hylaeamys Weksler, Percequillo, and Voss, 2006. In: Patton, J.L., Pardiñas, U.F.J. and D’Elía, G. (eds), Mammals of South America, pp. 335-346. The University of Chicago Press.

Weksler, M., Percequillo, A.R. and Voss, R.S. 2006. Ten new genera of Oryzomyine rodents (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae). American Museum Novitates 3537: 1-29.


Citation: Percequillo, A. & Roach, N. 2017. Hylaeamys oniscus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T15608A22327982. . Downloaded on 23 November 2017.
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