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Eulemur cinereiceps

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES LEMURIDAE

Scientific Name: Eulemur cinereiceps
Species Authority: (A. Grandidier & Milne-Edwards, 1890)
Common Name/s:
English White-collared Lemur, White-collared Brown Lemur, Grey-headed Lemur
Synonym/s:
Eulemur albocollaris (Rumpler, 1975)
Eulemur albocollaris Rumpler, 1975
Eulemur fulvus (A. Grandidier & Milne-Edwards, 1890) subspecies albocollaris
Taxonomic Notes: Johnson et al. (2008) confirmed that E. cinereiceps is not a separate taxon from E. albocollaris, and that priority should be given to the senior synonym, E. cinereiceps, as the valid name.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(i,ii,iii,v) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor/s: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P.
Reviewer/s: Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Endangered as the species has a range of only 700 km², it is fragmented, and there is ongoing decline in extent, area and quality of habitat, as well as in the numbers of mature individuals due to hunting.
History:
2000 Critically Endangered
1996 Endangered
1994 Vulnerable (Groombridge 1994)
1990 Vulnerable (IUCN 1990)
1990 Vulnerable (IUCN 1990)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species occurs only in south-eastern Madagascar in a thin strip of forest that runs from the Manampatrana River south to the Mananara River. An isolated population of this species occurs in the Manombo Special Reserve and in Mahabo Forest south of Farafangana. Recent analyses of Landsat imagery estimate that total habitat remaining within this species’ range is less than 700 km² (Johnson and Wyner 2000; Irwin et al. 2005). South-east of the Andringitra Massif, there is a 60 km wide hybrid zone between what is now E. rufifrons and E. cinereiceps at the Iantara River (headwaters of the Manampatrana), characterized by high density of figs and a high density of hybrid lemurs (58 /km²; Irwin et al. 2005). Ranges from 20-1,500 m.
Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: In the Manombo Special Reserve and Manombo Classified Forest, there are an estimated 60 mature individuals (J. Ratsimbazafy pers. comm.). Irwin et al. (2005) give a density estimate in Vevembe of 10 individuals/km²; however, south of this there is blackwater, white sand, low-productivity forest where densities will be lower. These authors determined a maximum population estimate of 7,265+/-2,268 individuals.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found in forest habitats. Three social groups with six to 11 individuals were identified at Mahabo, and two social groups of four to eight individuals were recorded at Manombo (Johnson et al. 2008). According to Johnson (2002), it is mainly frugivorous, its diet supplemented with leaves, flowers, and fungi. Flowers are an especially important food item late in the dry season. Their low densities are probably related to the poor availability of suitable fruit trees. This species more than others appears to have a more fission-fusion grouping pattern.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Selective logging, hunting and the continued conversion of rain forest habitat to agricultural land are the greatest threats to the survival of the white-collared lemur. It is trapped easily by hunters during the fruiting season of the strawberry guava (Psidium cattlianum) in Manombo (J. Ratsimbazafy pers. comm.). In the rest of its range it is hunted with shotguns, snares and slingshots particularly when it comes into coffee plantations.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix I of CITES. It is found in the Manombo Special Reserve; animals in the Andringitra National Park are mostly hybrids with E. rufifrons. Recent surveys have identified populations in unprotected forests (Vevembe and Lambohazo) that could be added to existing parks and reserves (Johnson and Overdorff 1999). Preservation of the corridor between Andrinitra and the current range, which includes the hybrid zone between E. rufifrons and E. cinereiceps, is a priority. The Missouri Botanical Garden is also presently active in managing and upgrading the protected status of the littoral forest of Mahabo. As of 2007, this species was reported from four zoological collections (Mittermeier et al. 2008).
Citation: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P. 2008. Eulemur cinereiceps. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 24 April 2014.
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