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Dusicyon australis 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_on

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Carnivora Canidae

Scientific Name: Dusicyon australis
Species Authority: (Kerr, 1792)
Common Name(s):
English Falklands Wolf, Falkland Islands Wolf
Spanish Zorro Antártico, Zorro-Lobo de las Malvinas , Zorro Malvinense
Synonym(s):
Canis australis Kerr, 1792

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Extinct ver 3.1
Year Published: 2015
Date Assessed: 2015-08-13
Assessor(s): Sillero-Zubiri, C.
Reviewer(s): Hoffmann, M.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Hoffmann, M.
Justification:
Dusicyon australis was endemic to the Falkland Islands. It was discovered in 1690 and was still present when Charles Darwin visited the Falklands in 1833-1834. However, throughout the 1800s, the population declined drastically due to persecution. The last individual is believed to have been killed in 1876.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2008 Extinct (EX)
2004 Extinct (EX)
1996 Extinct (EX)
1994 Extinct (Ex)
1990 Extinct (Ex)
1988 Extinct (Ex)
1986 Extinct (Ex)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: The Falklands Wolf was endemic to the Falkland Islands, and was present in both West and East Falklands.
Countries occurrence:
Regionally extinct:
Falkland Islands (Malvinas)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Dusicyon australis probably reached the Falkland Islands from the mainland 480 km away during the last glacial age (Slater et al. 2009). A close relative, D. avus, may have persisted in the Pampean and Patagonian regions of Argentina until after 1500 (Prevosti et al. 2015). The Falklands Wolf was discovered in 1690 and was still present when Charles Darwin visited the Falklands in 1833-1834. However, the population of West Falkland was already declining rapidly by then, and by 1865 it was no longer found on the eastern part of East Falkland. The last Falklands Wolf is believed to have been killed in 1876 at Shallow Bay, West Falkland Islands.
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: There is no information available on specific habitats favoured by this species. Falkland Islands habitat generally comprises rocky scrub, marsh and grassland, and dwarf shrub heath (Falklands Conservation 2012).
Systems: Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: The species was hunted by Argentine settlers in early 1800s, and by US fur traders in the 1830s.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The species was hunted by Argentine settlers in early 1800s, and by US fur traders in the 1830s. Due to being tame and curious and unafraid of humans, it was particularly susceptible to culling. Scottish settlers and their sheep flocks arrived in the 1860s and considered D. australis a pest and a threat to their sheep, setting fire to brushwood and laying out poison baits.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: A Falklands Wolf was taken to Britain and lived in the London Zoo in 1868. In 1870, the surviving member of a pair of animals sent by Mr Byng, the acting colonial secretary of the Falklands, arrived in London Zoo. It lived for a few years. However, no reproduction in captivity was reported.

Citation: Sillero-Zubiri, C. 2015. Dusicyon australis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T6923A82310440. . Downloaded on 26 June 2016.
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