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Plethodon cylindraceus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA AMPHIBIA CAUDATA PLETHODONTIDAE

Scientific Name: Plethodon cylindraceus
Species Authority: (Harlan, 1825)
Common Name(s):
English White-spotted Slimy Salamander
Taxonomic Notes: This species is part of the Plethodon glutinosus complex. It is not universally accepted as a valid species (Petranka 1998). It was accepted as a distinct species by Crother et al. (2000).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2014
Date Assessed: 2014-02-28
Assessor(s): IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group
Reviewer(s): Angulo, A.
Contributor(s): Hammerson, G.A. & Garcia Moreno, J.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Garcia Moreno, J.
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution and presumed large population.
History:
2004 Least Concern

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found in the eastern USA, in the Piedmont and Blue Ridge physiographic provinces of Virginia and North Carolina west to the French Broad River and south to the northern Piedmont of South Carolina, and parts of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province in western Virginia and extreme eastern West Virginia and in a small area of the Coastal Plain of eastern Virginia (Highton et al. 1989); also probably the Blue Ridge Mountains and Valley and Ridge provinces in northeastern Tennessee (Redmond and Scott 1996).
Countries:
Native:
United States
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It is widespread and common.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Its habitat is presumed to be the same as that for Plethodon glutinosus: Wooded slopes, ravines, floodplains, shalebanks, and cave entrances, most often in hardwood forest, sometimes in pinelands. It is generally under or in rotting logs, stumps, or leaf-litter, or under rocks, during the day. It goes underground during dry or freezing weather. Eggs are laid in rotting logs, underground, or in rock crevices, where they develop directly without a larval stage.
Systems: Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: There are no records of this species being utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Intensive harvest of mature forest greatly reduces salamander density in the logged area; population recovery occurs slowly (Herbeck and Larsen 1999). However, logging does not constitute a major threat to the security of the global population.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Maintenance of mature hardwood forest habitat is key to the long-term persistence of viable populations of this species (Petranka 1998). Taxonomic research is needed to clarify its status.

Citation: IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group 2014. Plethodon cylindraceus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 27 August 2014.
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