Map_thumbnail_large_font

Apristurus exsanguis

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA CHONDRICHTHYES CARCHARHINIFORMES SCYLIORHINIDAE

Scientific Name: Apristurus exsanguis
Species Authority: Sato, Nakaya & Stewart, 1999
Common Name(s):
English Deepwater Catshark, Pale Catshark
Synonym(s):
Apristurus sp. D subspecies
Taxonomic Notes: The genus Apristurus is one of the most taxonomically confused groups of sharks. Most species are superficially very similar and many have been poorly described. Sexual dimorphism in some species, and changes in body proportions with growth also complicate identification. There are 33 described species of Apristurus, plus at least four other potentially undescribed species from New Zealand. A. exsanguis is similar to, but separate from Apristurus sp. B from New Zealand (Paulin et al. 1989) and Apristurus sp. A. from Australia (Last and Stevens 1994).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2003
Date Assessed: 2003-04-30
Annotations:
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Duffy, C. (SSG Australia & Oceania Regional Workshop, March 2003)
Reviewer(s): Fowler, S., Cavanagh, R.D. & Kyne, P.M. (Shark Red List Authority)
Justification:
Although this is an endemic species collection records indicate it is widespread and probably continuously distributed over the mid to lower slope around New Zealand. The biology of all Apristurus species within the New Zealand Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is very poorly known due to the uncertain taxonomy of the group. They appear to be most abundant below 1,000 m, and are the only sharks regularly taken in research trawls below 1,200 m on the Chatham Rise. As relatively little fishing occurs below 1,200 m depth a large part of these species’ populations may be effectively beyond fishing depths. Although the maximum recorded depth of A. exsanguis is 1,200 m there have been relatively few research trawls below this depth and it is possible that they occur deeper than this. There is also relatively little deepwater trawling effort in the northern part of the species distribution. This situation may change, however, as some fishing companies have conducted exploratory deepwater trips off northeast North Island.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Apristurus exsanguis is endemic to New Zealand. It has been recorded from off Three Kings Islands, North and South Islands, southern Lord Howe Rise, Challenger Plateau, Hikurangi Trough, Chatham Rise and Campbell Plateau to about 54°S. Depth 573 to 1,200 m.
Countries:
Native:
New Zealand
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Pacific – southwest
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There is no information on population size.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: The biology of all Apristurus species within the New Zealand Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) is very poorly known due to the uncertain taxonomy of the group. They appear to be most abundant below 1,000 m, and are the only sharks regularly taken in research trawls below 1,200 m on the Chatham Rise. A. exsanguis is a widespread mid to lower slope species. Probably bottom-living. Although its maximum recorded depth is 1,200 m there have been relatively few research trawls below this depth and it is possible that they occur deeper than this (Francis et al. 2002). Males and females mature between 650–700 mm total length. Reproduction is oviparous. The dark brown egg case is about 68 mm long and 29 mm wide. There is a slight constriction in the anterior third of the case, and its surface is entirely covered by fine fibers and fine longitudinal grooves. The edges of the egg case are flanged and end in horn-like processes with long coiled tendrils. Fecundity is unknown. Diet is probably similar to other Apristurus species (i.e., small bony fishes and caridean shrimps).
Systems: Marine

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Deepwater bottom trawling. As relatively little fishing occurs below 1,200 m and the species may occur in deeper water than this, a part of its population may be beyond current fishing depth (Anderson et al. 1998, Wetherbee 2000). There is also relatively little deepwater trawling effort in the northern part of the species distribution. This situation may change as deepwater fisheries expand.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Currently no conservation measures in place.

Citation: Duffy, C. (SSG Australia & Oceania Regional Workshop, March 2003) 2003. Apristurus exsanguis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 26 November 2014.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided