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Cedrela odorata 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Plantae Tracheophyta Magnoliopsida Sapindales Meliaceae

Scientific Name: Cedrela odorata L.
Common Name(s):
English Spanish Cedar, Cigar-box Wood, Red Cedar
French Acajou-bois, Acajou Rouge, Cedrat
Spanish Cedro Rojo

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A3bcd+4bcd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2017
Date Assessed: 2017-03-23
Assessor(s): Mark, J. & Rivers, M.C.
Reviewer(s): Oldfield, S.
Justification:
Cedrela odorata is a large tree. It is a Neotropical species found from Mexico southwards throughout central America to northern Argentina, as well as in the Caribbean. Deforestation data across its full range indicate that the range has decreased by 28.8% in the last 100 years (approximately three generations); and it is estimated to decline by 40.4% in the next 100 years. The main threat to this species is unsustainable harvest of the timber. Deforestation and the associated habitat loss threaten the species. It is listed here as Vulnerable.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Cedrela odorata is a Neotropical species found from Mexico southwards throughout central America to northern Argentina, as well as in the Caribbean (Pennington et al. 1981). It found up to 800 (possibly up to 1,500 m) altitude. It is now also being widely cultivated as a timber crop within the Neotropics and outside.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Antigua and Barbuda; Argentina; Barbados; Belize; Bolivia, Plurinational States of; Brazil; Cayman Islands; Colombia; Costa Rica; Cuba; Dominica; Dominican Republic; Ecuador; El Salvador; French Guiana; Grenada; Guadeloupe; Guatemala; Guyana; Haiti; Honduras; Jamaica; Mexico (Quintana Roo); Montserrat; Nicaragua; Panama; Peru; Saint Kitts and Nevis; Saint Lucia; Suriname; Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of
Additional data:
Upper elevation limit (metres):1500
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:Estimates of current total population are not available, Cedrela odorata can be a dominant component of various dry forest types. However, despite its widespread distribution it has been been selectively cut for at least 250 years, both for domestic use and for export (CITES 2007) and is now in decline. The tree has been the subject of great commercial interest and its distribution has been very much diminished by excessive exploitation over its entire range and large individuals have become scarce (Pennington et al. 1981). The distribution is also fragmented due to extensive deforestation (CITES 2007). The age distributions of some C. odorata subpopulations have been skewed by logging of the largest trees and there have been reports of trees being felled before they reach maturity. In Costa Rica its habitat has been reduced by 56.7 % (CITES 2007). Deforestation data across its full range indicate that the range has decreased by 28.8% in the last 100 years (approximately three generations); and it is estimated to decline by 40.4% in the next 100 years (Mark, unpublished data).
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Cedrela odorata is a large tree (up to 60 m tall). It occurs in humid or dry lowland forest, preferring well-drained soils. Is is highly light demanding and is a fast-growing pioneer species in secondary forest (Pennington et al. 1981). It is a monoecious species that is insect-pollinated and has wind-dispersed seed (Cavers et al. 2004).
Systems:Terrestrial
Generation Length (years):33

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Cedrela odorata is one of the world's most important timber species. It is used for a wide range of purposes including furniture and craft items. There are also records of medicinal uses of the bark as a febrifuge and tonic in some localities in Guatemala (Standley and Steyermark 1946) and it may have anti-malarial properties (Omar et al. 2003). It can also be used in reforestation and as a shade tree.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The main threat to this species is unsustainable harvest of the timber. Deforestation and the associated habitat loss threaten the species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:  The species has been listed in CITES Appendix III by Brazil, Bolivia, Colombia, Guatemala and Peru. National and regional assessments of this species vary (BGCI 2017): Critical Endangered in Cayman Islands (2008) and the Dominican Republic (2011); Endangered in Colombia (2007); Vulnerable in Brazil (2012) and in Guatemala (2006); subject to special protection in Mexico (2010); and Least Concern in Cuba (2016). Subpopulations are protected within national parks and agricultural landscapes. Attempts are being made to establish plantations throughout the tropics. A conservation management plan and monitoring of harvest and trade rates and their sustainability are needed. There are 42 known ex situ collections in botanic gardens and arboreta worldwide (BGCI 2017).

Citation: Mark, J. & Rivers, M.C. 2017. Cedrela odorata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2017: e.T32292A68080590. . Downloaded on 20 April 2018.
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