Accipiter brevipes 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Accipitriformes Accipitridae

Scientific Name: Accipiter brevipes
Species Authority: (Severtsov, 1850)
Regional Assessments:
Common Name(s):
English Levant Sparrowhawk
French Epervier à pieds courts
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2015
Date Assessed: 2013-11-03
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Butchart, S., Ekstrom, J., Khwaja, N. & Ashpole, J
This species has an extremely large range, and hence does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the range size criterion (extent of occurrence <20,000 km2 combined with a declining or fluctuating range size, habitat extent/quality, or population size and a small number of locations or severe fragmentation). The population trend appears to be stable, and hence the species does not approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population trend criterion (>30% decline over ten years or three generations). The population size may be moderately small to large, but it is not believed to approach the thresholds for Vulnerable under the population size criterion (<10,000 mature individuals with a continuing decline estimated to be >10% in ten years or three generations, or with a specified population structure). For these reasons the species is evaluated as Least Concern.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2013 Least Concern (LC)
2012 Least Concern (LC)
2009 Least Concern (LC)
2008 Least Concern (LC)
2004 Least Concern (LC)
2000 Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
1994 Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
1988 Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)

Geographic Range [top]

Countries occurrence:
Albania; Armenia (Armenia); Azerbaijan; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Cyprus; Djibouti; Egypt; Ethiopia; Georgia; Greece; Hungary; Iran, Islamic Republic of; Iraq; Israel; Jordan; Kazakhstan; Kuwait; Lebanon; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Moldova; Montenegro; Palestinian Territory, Occupied; Romania; Russian Federation; Saudi Arabia; Serbia (Serbia); South Sudan; Spain; Sudan; Syrian Arab Republic; Tunisia; Turkey; Ukraine; Yemen
Austria; Cameroon; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Czech Republic; Italy; Kenya; Niger; Poland; Qatar; Slovenia; Tanzania, United Republic of; United Arab Emirates; Uzbekistan
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO): Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO): No
Estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2: 660000
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO): Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO): No
Continuing decline in number of locations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations: No
Upper elevation limit (metres): 2000
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The population is estimated to number in the tens of thousands. The European population is estimated at 3,500-6,900 pairs, which equates to 7,000-13,800 mature individuals (BirdLife International 2015). Europe forms approximately 75-94% of the global range (BirdLife International 2004), so a very preliminary estimate of the global population size is 7,400-18,400 mature individuals, although further validation of this estimate is needed. This is placed in the band 10,000-19,999 mature individuals.

Trend Justification:  The population is suspected to be stable in the absence of evidence for any declines or substantial threats. In Europe the population trend is unknown (BirdLife International 2015).
Current Population Trend: Stable
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals: 10000-19999 Continuing decline of mature individuals: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations: No Population severely fragmented: No
Continuing decline in subpopulations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations: No All individuals in one subpopulation: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Behaviour The species is a migrant, likely wintering in sub-Saharan Africa (del Hoyo et al. 1994, Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001). Birds leave their breeding grounds in September, returning in April and May. It is usually solitary, but may hunt in pairs, and travels in flocks on migration which become especially large at certain bottlenecks (del Hoyo et al. 1994, Snow and Perrins 1998). It is sometimes active at twilight, and frequently migrates at night using flapping flight (del Hoyo et al. 1994, Ferguson-Lees and Christie 2001). Habitat It inhabits woody plains, often near water, and usually ranges up to 1,000 m (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Diet Lizards and large insects (the latter especially in Africa) make up the majority of its diet (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Breeding site It nests in tree branches, preferring deciduous trees (del Hoyo et al. 1994). Management information Deciduous forests in riparian zones appear to be the optimal habitat for this species (del Hoyo et al. 1994).
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat: Unknown
Generation Length (years): 7.2
Movement patterns: Full Migrant
Congregatory: Congregatory (and dispersive)

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It is highly vulnerable to the impacts of potential wind energy development (Strix 2012). This species is considered undesirable for falconry in Georgia, and many are killed after being captured by falconers who are attempting to catch other, more desirable species (Orta and Marks 2014). Following the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, the proportion of juvenile birds migrating over Eilat, Israel decreased, leading researchers to suggest that radioactive contamination may have resulted in a decrease in reproductive success (Yosef and Fornasari 2004).

Citation: BirdLife International. 2015. Accipiter brevipes. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2015: e.T22695499A80221557. . Downloaded on 28 November 2015.
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