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Trogon bairdii 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_onStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Trogoniformes Trogonidae

Scientific Name: Trogon bairdii
Species Authority: Lawrence, 1868
Common Name(s):
English Baird's Trogon
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-05-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Biamonte, E., Criado, J., Sandoval, L., Sánchez, C., Sánchez, J. & Zook, J.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Benstead, P., Isherwood, I., Taylor, J.
Justification:
This species has a small range, in which habitat is declining owing to deforestation. However, the range is not yet severely fragmented or restricted to few locations. For these reasons, the species is classified as Near Threatened.

Previously published Red List assessments:
2008 Near Threatened (NT)
2004 Near Threatened (NT)
2000 Lower Risk/near threatened (LR/nt)
1994 Lower Risk/near threatened (LR/nt)
1988 Threatened (T)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Trogon bairdii is fairly common in suitable habitat on the Pacific slope of south-west Costa Rica, but there are very few recent records in extreme west Panama (Ridgely and Gwynne 1989, Stiles and Skutch 1989, Angehr and Jordán 1998). There are an estimated 450-1,800 mature individuals in the Important Bird Areas of Costa Rica (J. Criado et al. in litt. 2007, Unión de Ornitólogos de Costa Rica in litt. 2011), thus it is estimated that there are 1,000-5,000 mature individuals in total.

Countries occurrence:
Native:
Costa Rica; Panama
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO): Yes
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO): No
Estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2: 12500
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO): Yes
Extreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO): No
Continuing decline in number of locations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations: No
Upper elevation limit (metres): 1250
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There are an estimated 450-1,800 mature individuals in the Important Bird Areas of Costa Rica (J. Criado et al. in litt. 2007, Unión de Ornitólogos de Costa Rica in litt. 2011), thus it is estimated that there are 1,000-5,000 mature individuals in total, probably equivalent to a total population of 1,500-7,500 individuals.

Trend Justification:  The population is suspected to be in decline owing to continued forest clearance.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals: 1000-5000 Continuing decline of mature individuals: Yes
Extreme fluctuations: No Population severely fragmented: No
Continuing decline in subpopulations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations: No All individuals in one subpopulation: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It is restricted to tall rainforest, and adjacent secondary growth on the forest edge, at elevations up to 1,200 m (Stiles and Skutch 1989). It feeds on fruit and insects, and has been observed to take a small lizard (del Hoyo et al. 2001). Breeding takes place in April-August. Its nest is a rounded, unlined chamber with an ascending tunnel, 2-5 m up in a large decaying trunk. It lays 2-3 eggs, and has an incubation period of 16-17 days followed by a fledging period of c.25 days (del Hoyo et al. 2001).

Systems: Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat: Yes
Generation Length (years): 7.3
Movement patterns: Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Extensive forest clearance, for agricultural expansion and timber extraction, has drastically reduced its habitat in Costa Rica and may have almost extirpated the species in Panama (Ridgely and Gwynne 1989, del Hoyo et al. 2001). Forest clearance for cultivation and cattle pasture has been the main process driving habitat loss in the past, but more recently pressure has come from increased coastal development and clearance for extensive oil-palm and pineapple plantations (Unión de Ornitólogos de Costa Rica in litt. 2011).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
Its core populations occur in Corcovado National Park, Manuel Antonio National Park, Peñas Blancas Wildlife Refuge, Carara Biological Reserve, the lowlands of La Amistad International Park, and several private reserves (del Hoyo et al. 2001, Unión de Ornitólogos de Costa Rica in litt. 2011).

Conservation Actions Proposed
Carry out surveys to assess the species's population size. Search for the species on the Caribbean slope of Panama and southern Costa Rica. Monitor rates of habitat loss and degradation. Increase the area of suitable habitat that is protected. Encourage the restoration of lowland and middle-elevation forest.


Citation: BirdLife International. 2012. Trogon bairdii. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2012: e.T22682776A38161294. . Downloaded on 08 February 2016.
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