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Chlorurus capistratoides

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES LABRIDAE

Scientific Name: Chlorurus capistratoides
Species Authority: (Bleeker, 1847)
Common Name(s):
English Pink-margined Parrotfish
Synonym(s):
Scarus capistratoides Bleeker, 1847
Taxonomic Notes: Westneat and Alfaro (2005) recognize the Scarini as a tribe within the family Labridae.

The genera Chlororus and Scarus are two distinct monophyletic lineages. The sister species is C. microrhinos (Smith et al. 2008).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2009-09-16
Assessor(s): Choat, J.H., Carpenter, K.E., Clements, K.D., Rocha, L.A., Russell, B., Myers, R., Lazuardi, M.E., Muljadi, A., Pardede, S. & Rahardjo, P.
Reviewer(s): McIlwain, J. & Craig, M.T.
Justification:
This species is a small and widespread species. It occurs at a number of marine protected areas in parts of its range. It is targeted only incidentally. Its habitat on outer reef slopes and small size precludes systematic targeting especially at remote sites. It is therefore listed as Least Concern.
History:
2010 Least Concern

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found from Kenya (R.F. Myers pers comm. 2009) through Mauritius, Seychelles, Chagos Archipelago, Maldive Islands, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, and the Indian Ocean coast of Sumatra and Java.

It has been recorded from Christmas and Cocos Islands, Ashmore Reef, east Timor and a market in Peng Hu, Taiwan (J.H. Choat pers comm. 2009). It is also found in Halmahera, Indonesia (Green and Muljadi 2009), Samboan and Sumilon Island, Cebu, Philippines (K. Carpenter pers comm. 2009).
Countries:
Native:
British Indian Ocean Territory (Chagos Archipelago); Christmas Island; Cocos (Keeling) Islands; Indonesia; Kenya; Maldives; Mauritius (Mauritius (main island), Rodrigues); Myanmar; Philippines; Réunion; Seychelles; Sri Lanka; Taiwan, Province of China; Thailand; Timor-Leste
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Indian Ocean – eastern; Indian Ocean – western; Pacific – northwest; Pacific – western central
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: This species is widespread but with patchy distribution. It is not common in its range of distribution (Bellwood 2001, Randall and Bruce 1983).

More than 1 and less than 10 individuals were recorded in 1 hour of roving surveys in Sumilon and Samboan, Philippines (K. Carpenter pers comm. 2009).
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is generally solitary or in small groups. It inhabits reef flats to outer reef slopes from sheltered to moderately exposed environments.
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is infrequently taken in artisanal fishing in the Indian Ocean. It is captured in the Philippines, Taiwan and Indonesia for food.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no major threats known for this species. This species is captured for food in parts of its range. However, its habitat on outer reef slopes and small size precludes systematic targeting especially at remote sites.

Parrotfishes show varying degrees of habitat preference and utilization of coral reef habitats, with some species spending the majority of their life stages on coral reefs, while others primarily utilize seagrass beds, mangroves, algal beds, and /or rocky reefs. Although the majority of the parrotfishes occur in mixed habitat (primarily inhabiting seagrass beds, mangroves, and rocky reefs) approximately 78% of these mixed habitat species are experiencing greater than 30% loss of coral reef area and habitat quality across their distributions. Of those species that occur exclusively in coral reef habitat, more than 80% are experiencing a greater than 30% of coral reef loss and degradation across their distributions. However, more research is needed to understand the long-term effects of habitat loss and degradation on these species populations.   Widespread coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for species that depend on live coral reefs for food and shelter especially as studies have shown that protection of pristine habitats facilitate the persistence of adult populations in species that have spatially separated adult and juvenile habitats. Furthermore, coral reef loss and declining habitat conditions are particularly worrying for some corallivorous excavating parrotfishes that play major roles in reef dynamics and sedimentation (Comeros-Raynal et al. 2012).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. However, its distribution overlaps several marine protected areas within its range.

Citation: Choat, J.H., Carpenter, K.E., Clements, K.D., Rocha, L.A., Russell, B., Myers, R., Lazuardi, M.E., Muljadi, A., Pardede, S. & Rahardjo, P. 2012. Chlorurus capistratoides. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 25 July 2014.
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