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Enoplometopus daumi

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA MALACOSTRACA DECAPODA ENOPLOMETOPIDAE

Scientific Name: Enoplometopus daumi
Species Authority: Holthuis, 1983
Common Name(s):
English Striped Reef Lobster

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Data Deficient ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2009-12-03
Assessor(s): Chan, T.Y. & Wahle, R.
Reviewer(s): Collen, B., Livingstone, S. & Richman, N.
Contributor(s): Batchelor, A., De Silva, R., Dyer, E., Kasthala, G., Lutz, M.L., McGuinness, S., Milligan, H.T., Soulsby, A.-M. & Whitton, F.
Justification:
Enoplometopus daumi has been assessed as Data Deficient. It is known from Indonesia and the Philippines and inhabits shallow coral reefs. This is a highly prized species in the aquarium trade industry, however no regulations are in place to manage the collection of wild specimens. No catch data for this species is available, and it is not considered to be common. Furthermore, coral reefs in both Indonesia and the Philippines are under high levels of stress and habitat degradation in combination with fishing pressure might cause declines in this species population numbers. Further research is required to establish its population size, and the potential effects of harvesting and habitat degradation on this species’ population.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is found in the Indo-West Pacific Ocean (Chan and Ng 2008). It is known from Indonesia and the Philippines (Holthuis 1983, Chan 1998).
Countries:
Native:
Indonesia; Philippines
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Pacific – western central
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There is no population information available for this species, but it is not considered to be common (Chan 1998).
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found on shallow coral reefs at depths of 0-1 m (Chan 1998, Poupin 2002). It is considered to be shy and is often found hiding in rock cavities (Holthuis 1983, Chan 1998).
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is often taken for the pet industry (Chan 1998, Calado et al. 2003).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This is a highly prized and very popular species in the aquarium trade industry (Chan 1998, Calado et al. 2003). Specimens are collected from wild populations using the chemical rotenone, and manually by divers (Chan 1998, Calado et al. 2003). Export of live specimens is likely to occur on a regular basis from Indonesia and the Philippines (Chan 1998). However, no catch data for this species is available and it is unknown if the harvesting of wild specimens has any significant effects on its population size. Furthermore, coral reefs in both the Philippines and Indonesia are exposed to a number of threats, such as destructive fishing practices (cyanide and blast fishing), increase in sedimentation due to deforestation and coastal developments, coral bleaching and climate change, which have led major degradation of coral reef habitats (Burke et al. 2002).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Only a few countries have implemented regulations on the collection of ornamental decapods and further research is needed to improve our understanding of species’ reproductive biology, growth, and population structure to ensure that appropriate conservation measures can be put in place (Calado et al. 2003). No catch data for this species is available; it should be noted this species is not considered to be common (Chan 1998). Further research is required to establish its population size and the potential effects of harvesting on this species’ population. Furthermore, conservation measures should be put in place to protect this species’ habitat. Coral reefs in both Indonesia and the Philippines are under high levels of stress, degradation, and fishing pressure; which increases the possibility of a decline in this species population numbers.

Citation: Chan, T.Y. & Wahle, R. 2013. Enoplometopus daumi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 24 July 2014.
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