Map_thumbnail_large_font

Propithecus coronatus

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_onStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES INDRIIDAE

Scientific Name: Propithecus coronatus
Species Authority: Milne-Edwards, 1871
Common Name/s:
English Crowned Sifaka
Synonym/s:
Propithecus verreauxi (Milne-Edwards, 1871) subspecies coronatus
Taxonomic Notes: Considered a subspecies of P. verreauxi by Groves (1993) and of P. deckenii by Groves (2001). Thalmann et al. (2002) argued that it deserved species status, recently supported by the craniometric study of Groves and Helgen (2007) which found this species to have highly distinctive cranial features.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered A2cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor/s: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P.
Reviewer/s: Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Endangered as although the range of this species is not well known, it is thought to have undergone a reduction of more than 50% over the past 30 years (assuming a generation length of 10 years) due primarily to a decline in area and quality of habitat within the known range of the species, and also due to the effects of hunting.
History:
2000 Critically Endangered
1996 Critically Endangered (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)
1996 Critically Endangered

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: The species is distributed from the Mahavavy River to the south-west (separating it from P. deckenii) and the Betsiboka River to the north-east (separating it from P. coquereli). Petter et al. (1977) subsequently pointed out that hybridization between P. coronatus and P. deckenii probably occurred along the upper reaches of the Mahavavy River. Collections made in the forests of Ambararatabe (to the west of the Mahavavy River) and sightings along the Bongolava Massif (west of Tsiroanomandidy) also appear to include individuals of P. coronatus. Also, reliable reports of Crowned Sifakas as far south as the Sakay River, as far east as Andanotongo, and south-east beyond Tsiroanomandidy suggest that the distribution of this species is more complicated than originally believed (Tattersall 1986). Sea level to 700 m.
Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Where not hunted, fairly common. Muller et al. (2000) recorded densities of 48 groups/km² and 173 individuals/km² in Anjamena, using transect line sampling.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It is diurnal, inhabits dry deciduous forests and is often found in mangroves (which also form an important food source). Occurs in groups of two to eight individuals, with home ranges from 1.2 – 1.5 ha.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The main threat to this species is habitat loss, as forests within this species’ range have been lost to provide pasture for livestock and to produce charcoal. In some parts of the range they may be hunted, and captured for the pet trade.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is included on Appendix I of CITES. There are reports of its occurrence in two special reserves (Ambohijanahary and Kasijy), although the status of populations in these protected areas is questionable. Efforts should be made to secure protection for populations at Katsepy and Anjamena that have been the subject of brief studies and are also visited by tourists. In addition, there is a need for further survey of a few classified forests within the crowned sifaka’s possible range that may also harbor viable populations (Mittermeier et al. 2008). A project called Antrema is conserving coastal forest around Katsepy. There is a European captive breeding programme, with very few founders, but apparently showing some success (C. Schwitzer pers. comm.).
Citation: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P. 2008. Propithecus coronatus. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 20 April 2014.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please fill in the feedback form so that we can correct or extend the information provided