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Salvator merianae 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Reptilia Squamata Teiidae

Scientific Name: Salvator merianae
Species Authority: Duméril & Bibron, 1839
Common Name(s):
English Black-and-white Tegu, Argentine Black and White Tegu
Synonym(s):
Teius teguixim Gray, 1845
Tupinambis merianae (Duméril & Bibron, 1839)
Tupinambis teguixin (Gray, 1845)
Taxonomic Source(s): Harvey, M.B., Ugueto, G.N. and Gutberlet Jr., R.L. 2012. Review of Teiid morphology with a revised taxonomy and phylogeny of the Teiidae (Lepidosauria: Squamata). Zootaxa 3459: 1-156.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2014-11-25
Assessor(s): Scott, N., Pelegrin, N., Montero, R., Kacoliris, F., Fitzgerald, L., Carreira, S., Cacciali, P., Moravec, J., Cisneros-Heredia, D.F., Aparicio, J. & Avila-Pires, T.C.S.
Reviewer(s): Bowles, P.
Contributor(s): De Silva, R., Milligan, H.T., Wearn, O.R., Wren, S., Zamin, T., Sears, J., Wilson, P., Lewis, S., Lintott, P. & Powney, G.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Rodríguez, J. & NatureServe
Justification:
The Black and White Tegu is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a broad range of habitats, large population, and because it is unlikely to be undergoing significant population declines to qualify for listing in a more threatened category. Since this species is hunted for its skins and for local consumption, it is recommended that research is undertaken to ensure that any population declines are noted, and trade and harvest management plans are put in place where needed.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is found in Brazil, eastern Bolivia,  Paraguay, Uruguay, and in northern and central Argentina. This species has also been introduced to Fernando de Noronha Island, and Florida, USA; in the latter is considered a harmful invasive predator for birds and mammals.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Argentina; Bolivia, Plurinational States of; Brazil (Alagoas, Amazonas, Bahia, Brasília Distrito Federal, Ceará, Espírito Santo, Fernando de Noronha - Introduced, Goiás, Maranhão, Mato Grosso, Mato Grosso do Sul, Minas Gerais, Pará, Paraíba, Paraná, Pernambuco, Piauí, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Norte, Rio Grande do Sul, Rondônia, Santa Catarina, São Paulo, Sergipe, Tocantins); Paraguay
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This species is reported as common and it is believed to have a stable population.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It is a habitat and dietary generalist. Throughout its range it is found in primary on Cerrado vegetation, forest clearings, secondary forest, disturbed habitats including edges of roads and agricultural areas. The species feeds on a wide range of animals and fruit and may play an important role in seed dispersal (de Castro and Galetti 2004). It does not occur in dry Chaco of western Paraguay, Argentina and southeastern Bolivia (L. Fitzgerald pers. comm. 2014)
Systems:Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is hunted for its skins and to a lesser degree to supply the commercial pet trade (Mieres and Fitzgerald 2006). The majority of individuals used are removed from the wild. The trade in species of this genus has decreased in recent years, and is monitored by management programmes in Argentina, Bolivia and Paraguay, and by CITES. This and other species of this genus are also hunted for human consumption on a local level (L. Fitzgerald pers. comm. 2014).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The species has withstood decades of commercial harvest. It is a habitat and dietary generalist and is widespread. There are no major threats to this species that would decrease its geographic range and distribution. This species is hunted for its skins and to a lesser degree to supply the commercial pet trade. During the 1980s on average 1.9 million Tupinambis lizard skins were traded annually (Mieres and Fitzgerald 2006). The trade in Tupinambis has decreased since that period, and in 1999 the export quotas from Argentina and Paraguay was 1,350,000 skins per year (Fitzgerald et al 1999). This and other species of this genus are also hunted for human consumption on a local level (L. Fitzgerald pers. comm. 2014).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Argentina and Paraguay monitor the harvest levels of this species and have implemented management plans (Mieres and Fitzgerald 2006). The management plans have been designed to achieve sustainable use of the species while benefiting local people (Fitzgerald 1994). Existing monitoring and management programs for lizards of this genus in Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia need to be supported and enhanced to ensure the programs become institutionalized (L. Fitzgerald pers. comm. 2014). This species is listed on CITES Appendix II. Further research is needed to estimate population size of this species. Embert (2007) reports that this species occurs in several protected areas within its range.

Citation: Scott, N., Pelegrin, N., Montero, R., Kacoliris, F., Fitzgerald, L., Carreira, S., Cacciali, P., Moravec, J., Cisneros-Heredia, D.F., Aparicio, J. & Avila-Pires, T.C.S. 2016. Salvator merianae. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T178340A61322552. . Downloaded on 20 August 2017.
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