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Gymnosarda unicolor

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII PERCIFORMES SCOMBRIDAE

Scientific Name: Gymnosarda unicolor
Species Authority: (Rüppell, 1836)
Common Name(s):
English Dogtooth Tuna
French Thon Blanc, Thon à Gros Yeux, Bonite à Gros Yeux, Thon Dents de Chien, Thon Gros Yeux
Spanish Casarte Ojón
Synonym(s):
Gymnosarda nuda (Günther, 1860)
Pelamys nuda Günther, 1860
Scomber vau Curtiss, 1938
Thynnus unicolor Rüppell, 1836

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2011
Date Assessed: 2009-12-05
Assessor(s): Collette, B., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Juan Jorda, M. & Nelson, R.
Reviewer(s): Russell, B. & Polidoro, B.
Justification:
This species is widespread in the Indo-West Pacific. There is no population information available, but it is caught in artisanal and recreational fisheries throughout its range. There may be localized depletions given that it is a solitary species, but it is unlikely that there are currently widespread population declines. It is listed as Least Concern. More research is need on this species biology and population trends.
For further information about this species, see TUNAS_SkiJumpEffect.pdf.
A PDF viewer such as Adobe Reader is required.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This Indo-Pacific species is found from the Red Sea and East Africa to French Polynesia, north to Japan, south to Australia. Its distribution is disjunct as this species is found primarily around reefs. There are several records from Taiwan (Taiwan Fisheries Research Institue FRIP 21529) that was caught as bycatch in tuna long-line.
Countries:
Native:
Australia; China; Christmas Island; Cocos (Keeling) Islands; Comoros; Cook Islands; Djibouti; Egypt; Eritrea; Fiji; French Polynesia; Guam; Hong Kong; India; Indonesia; Japan; Jordan; Korea, Republic of; Madagascar; Maldives; Marshall Islands; Mauritius; Micronesia, Federated States of ; Mozambique; Myanmar; New Caledonia; Northern Mariana Islands; Oman; Palau; Papua New Guinea; Philippines; Pitcairn; Réunion; Samoa; Saudi Arabia; Seychelles; South Africa; Sri Lanka; Sudan; Taiwan, Province of China; Tanzania, United Republic of; Tonga; Tuvalu; Vanuatu; Yemen
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Indian Ocean – eastern; Indian Ocean – western; Pacific – eastern central; Pacific – northwest; Pacific – southwest; Pacific – western central
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There are no fisheries directed specifically at this species but it is regularly caught in small numbers mostly in artisanal fisheries with hand-lines, pole, and trolling during certain seasons in many parts of its range (Collette and Nauen 1983).

FAO worldwide reported landings fluctuate, but in general show a gradual increase in reported catch from 94 tonnes in 1971 to a high of 808 tonnes in 2003 (FAO 2009).
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is reef-associated and oceanodromous, found offshore mainly around coral reefs, and may occur to depths of at least 300 m (Braud and Grand Perrin 1984). It is generally solitary or occurs in small schools of six or less. It preys on small schooling fishes such as Decapterus, Caesio, Nasio, Cirrhilabrus, Pterocaesio and adults may be ciguatoxic (Randall 1980).

Size at first maturity is 65 cm  fork length (FL) (Lewis et al. 1983). Maximum Size is 247 cm FL. The all-tackle angling record is of a 104.32 kg fish caught off LeMorne, Mauritius in 1993 (IGFA 2011).
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This is a minor commercial species where high catches are not maintained. This species is marked canned and frozen (Collette 2001).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This is a minor commercial species that is caught mainly by pole-and-line, and is also caught in sport fisheries  There are no fisheries directed specifically at this species but it is regularly caught in small numbers mostly in artisanal fisheries with hand-lines, pole, and trolling during certain seasons in many parts of its range (Collette and Nauen 1983). Initial high catches are usually not maintained, perhaps because it is a solitary species and does not school.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures. This species may occur in some protected areas within its range, such as the Great Barrier Reef. More research is need on this species biology and population trends.

Citation: Collette, B., Di Natale, A., Fox, W., Juan Jorda, M. & Nelson, R. 2011. Gymnosarda unicolor. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 26 November 2014.
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