157598-1

Aromia moschata 

Scope: Europe
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Coleoptera Cerambycidae

Scientific Name: Aromia moschata (Linnaeus, 1758)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern (Regional assessment) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-06-05
Assessor(s): Nieto, A., Dodelin, B., Campanaro, A., Mannerkoski, I. & Méndez, M.
Reviewer(s): Alexander, K. & Nieto, A.
Justification:

European regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large overall population, it occurs in a number of protected areas, has a tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

EU 27 regional assessment: listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large overall population, it occurs in a number of protected areas, has a tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is widely distributed in the Palaearctic region and occurs throughout much of Europe (Bense 1995).

In Hungary it is widespread in river valleys and hilly and lower mountain areas. In Romania it is spread along the river valleys from the plains up into the hills and mountains. In Portugal it is widespread, with few records. In European Turkey it has been reported from Istanbul (Acatay 1943, Oymen 1987, Canakcıoglu 1993) and Edirne and KIrklareli (Ozay 1997).

In Denmark it is distributed almost throughout the country (Thomsen 2007) and it is widespread in Finland. It is widespread in Britain, but very patchy.

Countries occurrence:
Native:
Austria; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Czech Republic; Denmark; Estonia; Finland; France (Corsica, France (mainland)); Germany; Greece (Greece (mainland)); Hungary; Ireland; Italy (Italy (mainland), Sicilia); Latvia; Liechtenstein; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Moldova; Montenegro; Netherlands; Norway; Poland; Portugal (Azores, Portugal (mainland)); Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, East European Russia, European Russia, Kaliningrad, North European Russia, Northwest European Russia, South European Russia); Serbia (Kosovo, Serbia); Slovakia; Slovenia; Spain (Spain (mainland)); Sweden; Switzerland; Turkey (Turkey-in-Europe); Ukraine (Krym, Ukraine (main part)); United Kingdom (Great Britain, Northern Ireland)
Additional data:
Lower elevation limit (metres):20
Upper elevation limit (metres):600
Range Map:157598-1

Population [top]

Population:A widespread species and common throughout much of its range. Population trend considered to be stable overall, although a significant decline has occurred in some areas, e.g. Britain.

In Ireland it has a widespread but very fragmented distribution; best known in the south-west but with isolated populations in the north.It is widespread across much of Britain, but very localized and becoming increasingly scarce - there are more old records than current ones; the main stronghold is the low-lying area of the former Great Fen of eastern England (Twinn and Harding 1999).

In Ukraine it is a common species. In Hungary the population size and trend have not been quantified, although the species is rather common on its localities (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In Romania this species tends to be more frequent near riverside valley from low mountains, defiles, etc. In Germany it is widespread and not rare, occurring in all States. In Finland it is not uncommon while in Italy and Spain it is common. In the European part of Turkey the population size and trend have not been quantified.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:

The status of this species as a saproxylic is unclear as development begins in living woody tissues.

It develops in broad-leaved trees (especially Salix, occasionally Populus, Alnus, Acer). The larvae first develop in the thick but living wood of  trunks and branches, later tunnelling between living & dead tissues; it prefers young healthy growths rather than established trees (Kaufmann 1990). The life cycle is at least three years, with pupation in spring within wood. Adults overwinter in the pupal cell and emerge in VI-IX, they fly during periods of warm sunshine although rest of time spent motionless on twigs and branches in the canopy;; they are attracted to flowers for nectar and are also attracted to anything sweet, including discarded wrappers of ice lollies (K.N.A. Alexander pers comm 2009). In Romania it has been observed on old Salix, also on Populus and Acer; the adult has been found resting on leaves of Typha and at white flowers of Umbelliferae. In European Turkey larvae develop in old trunks and branches of Salix; the adults are active in VI-VIII (Canakcıoglu 1993). In Finland the species lives on Salix caprea. In Germany it lives mostly in Salix; it uses small diameter branches and trunks (less than five cm).

Primarily a riverine and floodplain species; the larva is tolerant of submergence for many weeks. It lives in wet woodlands and waterside trees in the UK (K.N.A. Alexander pers. comm. 2009). In Hungary it lives mainly in riverine and swamp willow forests, but occurs also in deciduous forests where goat willows occurs (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). All records from Portugal are from riverine areas.


Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Yes

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Saproxylic Coleoptera tend to be popular with beetle collectors although trade is rarely an issue, the only exceptions being a few larger species of more dramatic form or colour.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Clearance of waterside trees and wet woodland, as well as habitat loss due to logging of old willows, are threats to this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is known from many protected sites (e.g. UK, Hungary, Romania). It is listed as Near Threatened in Germany (2009). The species is legally protected in Hungary.

Citation: Nieto, A., Dodelin, B., Campanaro, A., Mannerkoski, I. & Méndez, M. 2010. Aromia moschata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T157598A5104121. . Downloaded on 15 August 2018.
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