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Hemidactylus turcicus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA REPTILIA SQUAMATA GEKKONIDAE

Scientific Name: Hemidactylus turcicus
Species Authority: (Linnaeus, 1758)
Common Name(s):
English Turkish Gecko
French Hémidactyle turc
Spanish Salamanquesa Rosada
Synonym(s):
Lacerta turcica Linnaeus, 1758
Taxonomic Notes: Specimens from India, Pakistan, Arabian Peninsula, Iran, Sudan, Somalia and Kenya are now referable to H. robustus (S. Baha El Din 2006; Bauer et al. 2006).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2008-12-14
Assessor(s): Aram Agasyan, Aziz Avci, Boris Tuniyev, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailovic, Petros Lymberakis, Claes Andrén, Dan Cogalniceanu, John Wilkinson, Natalia Ananjeva, Nazan Üzüm, Nikolai Orlov, Richard Podloucky, Sako Tuniyev, Uğur Kaya, Milan Vogrin, Claudia Corti, Valentin Pérez Mellado, Paulo Sá-Sousa, Marc Cheylan, Juan Pleguezuelos, Sherif Baha El Din, C. Varol Tok
Reviewer(s): Cox, N. and Temple, H.J. (Global Reptile Assessment)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of extensive habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is widely distributed around the Mediterranean Basin, east through West Asia, often in built-up areas. In mainland Europe it is found in southwestern Portugal, southern and eastern Spain, southern France, much of coastal Italy, and coastal Slovenia, Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, southern Montenegro, southeast to western Albania and most of Greece. It is found on numerous islands in the Mediterranean, including the Balearic Islands, Corsica, Sardinia, Sicily, Malta, Crete and Cyprus, and many smaller islands in the Tyrrhenian, Adriatic and Aegean Seas. In mainland Asia it is found in western and southern Turkey (coastal zones, as far inland as Afyon, with an isolated population at Samsun on the north coast), western Syria, Lebanon, Israel and western Jordan. On mainland Africa it is found from northern Morocco through northern Algeria, much of Tunisia, northern Libya, northern and eastern Egypt (including some offshore islands) and the Nile Valley. It was most likely introduced in antiquity through much of its supposedly native range, but it is no longer clear when and where these introductions took place. In more recent times, it has been widely introduced, with introduced populations known from the Canary Islands (Spain), the southern United States, parts of Mexico, Panama, Puerto Rico, Cuba and possibly Belize [not mapped here]. This is a lowland species that is occasionally found up to 1,100m asl. Arabian populations are now referred to H. robustus.
Countries:
Native:
Albania; Algeria; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Croatia; Cyprus; Egypt; Greece; Israel; Italy; Lebanon; Libya; Malta; Montenegro; Morocco; Portugal; Slovenia; Spain; Tunisia; Turkey
Introduced:
Cuba; France; Mexico; Panama; Puerto Rico; United States
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It is abundant over much of its distribution and its range and population is increasing.
Population Trend: Increasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It is extremely adaptable species. It is found in shrubland, rocky areas, salt marshes, coastal areas, cliffs, caves, on stone walls in agricultural areas and it is common in urban environments, including inside buildings. The females lay two to three clutches per year of one to two eggs.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no major threats to this very adaptable species. Animals are occasionally persecuted in tourist resorts, and there is some collection of the species for the pet trade, although this does not seem to have a significant impact on the overall population.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is listed on Annex III of the Bern Convention and is present in a number of protected areas. Further taxonomic studies on this species are needed, particularly for populations in the eastern and Arabian parts of its range (S. Baha El Din pers. comm.).

Citation: Aram Agasyan, Aziz Avci, Boris Tuniyev, Jelka Crnobrnja Isailovic, Petros Lymberakis, Claes Andrén, Dan Cogalniceanu, John Wilkinson, Natalia Ananjeva, Nazan Üzüm, Nikolai Orlov, Richard Podloucky, Sako Tuniyev, Uğur Kaya, Milan Vogrin, Claudia Corti, Valentin Pérez Mellado, Paulo Sá-Sousa, Marc Cheylan, Juan Pleguezuelos, Sherif Baha El Din, C. Varol Tok 2009. Hemidactylus turcicus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 29 November 2014.
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