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Lampsilis splendida

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA MOLLUSCA BIVALVIA UNIONOIDA UNIONIDAE

Scientific Name: Lampsilis splendida
Species Authority: (Lea, 1838)
Common Name(s):
English Rayed Pink Fatmucket
Taxonomic Notes: The species is closely related in morphology and known ecology to the eastern lampmussel (Lampsilis radiata) and it is believed that individuals classified as the rayed pink fatmucket may represent geomorphologic variation of the same species (Catena Group 2006).

A list of synonyms for this species can be found on The MUSSEL project web site (Graf and Cummings 2011).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-03-05
Assessor(s): Cummings, K. & Cordeiro, J.
Reviewer(s): Bohm, M., Collen, B. & Seddon, M.
Contributor(s): Richman, N., Dyer, E., Soulsby, A.-M., Whitton, F., Kasthala, G., McGuinness, S., Milligan, HT, De Silva, R., Herdson, R., Thorley, J., McMillan, K., Collins, A., Offord, S. & Duncan, C.
Justification:
Lampsilis splendida has been assessed as Least Concern. This species is currently considered stable in the Altamaha River system in Georgia with highly viable populations, but is rare elsewhere (Cooper-Santee, Pee Dee, Waccamaw, Cape Fear basins of North Carolina and South Carolina) with occurrences represented by few specimens; although it was never abundant outside the Altamaha system. Further research and surveys to monitor this species status would ensure appropriate conservation measures are implemented if the range declines further.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species occurs from the Altamaha River system north to the Cooper-Santee River System in South Carolina (Johnson 1970) and Cape Fear basin, North Carolina (Bogan 2002). This species occurs in the Savannah River Basin, the Wateree River and the Santee River both in the Cooper-Santee River Basin and the Waccamaw River of the Pee Dee River Basin in South Carolina (Bogan and Alderman 2004) and Bogan (2002) list it for the Waccamaw.
Countries:
Native:
United States (Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Historically, this species is known from seven occurrences in the Ocmulgee River system (no recent specimens, see Sukkestad et al. 2006) of Georgia, one in the Oconee River system, six in the Altamaha River system, one in the Ogeechee River system, six in the Savannah River system, one in the Wateree River, and three in the Santee River system. In a recent survey of the Altamaha River drainage it was found at about 60 occurrences of 276 sites surveyed (G. Keferl pers. comm. 2000). Bogan and Alderman (2004) list the South Carolina distribution as in the Savannah River basin, the Wateree River and the Santee River both in the Cooper-Santee River basin; and the Waccamaw River of the Pee Dee River basin. Recently found in low numbers in three sites in the Pee Dee River drainage (Pocotaligo River at Brewington Lake; Lynches River, Waccamaw River) in South Carolina (Catena Group 2006).

This species is not very common in South Carolina, and most likely is restricted to the coastal plain there (G. Keferl pers. comm. 2000) including the Pee Dee basin where it is rare (Catena Group 2006). This was the second most common mussel (over 1,800) observed during a recent survey of the Altamaha River system in Georgia (G.Keferl pers. comm. 2000). Population information is not available for other occurrences.

This was the second most common mussel (over 1,800) observed during a recent survey of the Altamaha River system in Georgia (G. Keferl pers. comm. 2000). Population information is not available for other occurrences. In the ACF basin, it was recently collected from 25 of 324 sites (15 live, 59 shells) in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia in the mainstem of the Apalachicola River and mainstem and tributaries of the Flint and Chipola Rivers but not in the Chattahoochee River system in Florida and Georgia only (Brim-Box and Williams 2000). This species was found in shallow habitats in low numbers (maximum 2 at two sites) at three sites in a 61 site survey of the Pee Dee basin in South Carolina (Catena Group 2006), but this species may have been under-detected at some of the sites, as most of the survey efforts focused on deep water habitats.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found in areas with little or no current, in sand to soft mud. It is particularly common in sloughs, oxbows, lakes, mouths of streams and backwater areas (G. Keferl pers. comm. 2000).
Systems: Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Threats include excessive siltation, destabilization of banks and sandbars, chemical pollution, and extremely low water levels.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: No wide-ranging conservation actions have been undertaken for this species. This species has been given a NatureServe Global Heritage Status of G3 - Vulnerable (NatureServe 2009). Further research and surveys are suggested to monitor this species' status to ensure appropriate conservation measures are implemented if the range declines further.

Citation: Cummings, K. & Cordeiro, J. 2012. Lampsilis splendida. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 21 October 2014.
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