Species Fact Sheet: Summary Tab

The species fact sheet Summary tab presents information in the following sections.

 

Taxonomy
Assessment Information
Geographic Range
Population
Habitat and Ecology
Use and Trade
Threats
Conservation Actions

Taxonomy (back to top)

The Taxonomy section includes:

  • Higher taxonomy (Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order and Family).

  • Scientific name (genus and species).

  • Authority details wherever possible. Note: that for animals the date of description is usually shown, but for plants this is not the case.

  • If any infra-ranks (subspecies or varieties) or subpopulations have been assessed, hyperlinks to those assessments are provided in this section. For more informaiton on infra-rank and subpopulation assessments on The IUCN Red List, click here.

  • Common names, if these are available. Note that currently only English, French and Spanish language common names are provided. Preferred common names are not highlighted at present.

  • Synonyms. Please note that The IUCN Red List is not intended to be used as a comprehensive taxonomic reference source; lists of synonyms attached to species fact sheets are not comprehensive. Synonyms include:

    • Alternative names that are still in common use.
    • The original name used when the taxon was described (if the name has since been changed).
    • Names that appeared in past IUCN Red Lists that are no longer accepted as being correct.
    • Names that were incorrectly spelt in previous IUCN Red Lists (orthographic errors).
  • Taxonomic notes are included when there are particular taxonomic issues that need to be highlighted. These notes may also indicate taxonomic changes that will be made in future updates. Some taxonomic notes also include generic and species synonyms, or information about currently recognised subspecies.

Assessment Information (back to top)

The Assessment Information section includes:

  • The IUCN Red List Category and Criteria used for the assessment. Only the criteria met for the highest category to which the species can be assigned are specified. The version of the criteria used for the assessment is also indicated. All assessments from 1996-2000 used the 1994 IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria (version 2.3); all assessments after 2000 use the 2001 IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria (version 3.1).

  • Two dates are shown: the date the assessment was completed (Date Assessed), and the year in which it was published on the IUCN Red List (Year Published). IUCN encourages assessments to be submitted to the Red List Unit as soon as possible, however sometimes the assessment date and the year of publication are not the same. This may happen if, for example:

    • A large assessment project spends several years completing assessments for a large group of species then submits all of them to the Red List Unit at the same time.
    • A correction has been made to a published assessment; in this case the year published reflects the year in which the assessment corrected version was published.
  • For some assessments, one of the following Annotations may be displayed:

  • Assessor(s). This includes the names of the people or organizations responsible for using all relevant data currently available for the taxon to assess the taxon.

  • Reviewer(s). This includes the names of people who have reviewed the assessment and its supporting information. In the older assessments the name of the Red List Authority or organization the reviewers worked for may also indicated. For more information on the assessment review process, see the Assessment Process page.

  • Contributor(s). This information is shown only for those assessments where people provided information specifically for use in the assessment process but who were not directly involved in the actual assessment.

  • Facilitator/Compiler(s). This information is shown only for assessments where people facilitated the assessment process during a workshop, or compiled information for the species fact sheet but did not carry out or review the assessment.

  • The Justification displays the rationale for the assessment. This might include a link to a PDF file containing further information. For details on what type of information to include in the rationale, see the PDF Documentation Standards and Consistency Checks for IUCN Red List Assessments and Species Accounts.

  • For taxa that have been assessed more than once, the History field will be displayed. This lists all past assessments for the taxon that were published in previous versions of The IUCN Red List (or, for birds, historic assessments published by BirdLife International).

Geographic Range (back to top)

The Geographic Range section includes:

  • Range Description: A description of the taxon’s distribution. For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information. For details on what type of information to include for geographic range, see the PDF Documentation Standards and Consistency Checks for IUCN Red List Assessments and Species Accounts.

  • Countries: A list of all countries where the taxon occurs. For some taxa, this section also includes occurrence in sub-country units for large countries and islands far from mainland countries. Countries are grouped to indicate the taxon’s native range, and countries where the taxon is possibly extinct, extinct, reintroduced, introduced, or occurs as a vagrant. For more details on country and sub-country informaiton displayed on The IUCN Red List, click here.

  • FAO Marine Fishing Areas: Marine species fact sheets include FAO marine fishing areas where the taxon occurs. These are grouped in the same way as country occurrence (native, possibly extinct, etc). For more details on marine distribution information displayed on The IUCN Red List, click here.

  • Distribution Map: A hyperlink to the IUCN map browser where the taxon’s distribution map is displayed. This GIS map preferably displays the taxon’s distribution in the form of polygons (but point occurrences may also be displayed). Currently, not all taxa on The IUCN Red List have distribution maps available for them, however each year the number of maps increases with the ultimate aim of having distribution maps available for all taxa for which maps are possible to create.

Population (back to top)

The Population section includes:

  • A description of available information about the taxon’s population size and trends. For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information.

  • Population Trend: The following symbols are used to indicate the taxon’s current population trend:

Increasing
Decreasing
Stable

 

Uncertain / Unknown

 

Habitat and Ecology (back to top)

The Habitat and Ecology section includes:

  • A description of habitat and ecological requirements of the taxon. For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information.

  • Systems: All species fact sheets indicate which of the major systems the taxon occurs in (i.e., marine, freshwater, terrestrial).

Use and Trade (back to top)

The Use and Trade section includes:

  • A description of how the taxon is used (i.e., for food, medicine, or some form of raw material); what is harvested (e.g., entire individuals or specific parts such as fruit, bark, fins, horns, etc.); and the scale of harvest (e.g., international or national trade, subsistence use, etc.). For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information.

Threats (back to top)

The Threats section includes:

  • A description of the major threats affecting the taxon at both global and local levels. For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information.

Conservation Actions (back to top)

The Conservation Actions section includes:

  • A description of what conservation measures (or actions) are already in place or are recommended to improve the taxon’s status. For some taxa, this includes a link to a PDF file containing further information..