Recommended Supporting Information

The table below outlines the recommended supporting information for assessments being submitted for publication on The IUCN Red List. While the list of recommended supporting information is desirable, and strongly encouraged for all assessments for taxa prioritized in the IUCN Red List Strategic Plan 2012-2020 and IUCN Species Strategic Plan 2013-2016, it is not essential for other assessments being submitted to The IUCN Red List. Assessments that do not include any of the information listed below are still acceptable for submission to The IUCN Red List.

Table 3: Recommended supporting information

The guidance notes provided in this table often refer to the IUCN Species Information Service (SIS) as this is the central database used by Assessors within the IUCN SSC Specialist Group, Red List Authority, and Red List Partner networks.

Recommended Supporting Information Specific Condition Purpose Guidance Notes
1. GIS distribution map using IUCN's Standard Polygon and/or Point Attributes.  

(a) Useful to reduce the burden on the IUCN Red List Unit to create a GIS map.

(b) Facilitates spatial analyses.

(c) Allows visualization on The IUCN Red List website (and possible spatial queries).

Although provision of spatial distribution data is required in any form (see #8 in Table 1), a GIS map is recommended if possible.

For IUCN's Standard Polygon and Point Attributes, See Annex 1 in the current version of the Documentation Standards and Consistency Checks for IUCN Red List Assessments and Species Accounts.

2. Qualifiers (estimated, suspected, etc.) for direction of current population trend.   Useful for documenting uncertainty over the population trend code selected.  
3. Occurrence in specified sub-country units for large countries and islands far from mainland countries.   Useful for searching by sub-country on The IUCN Red List website. If a GIS map has been prepared, a list can be pre-populated by GIS overlay.
4. Occurrence in terrestrial and freshwater biogeographic realms. For terrestrial and freshwater taxa. Useful for searching on The IUCN Red List website, and for analyses. A GIS tool will soon be available to facilitate automatic coding of this in SIS from distribution maps. Note that currently there is no widely accepted equivalent system for the marine realm.
5. Elevation or depth limits.   Useful for supporting Assessments, describing the distribution, and particularly for considering impacts of climate change.  
6. Coding of Stresses and Timing for Threats.   Useful for demonstrating the means by which threats impact taxa, and for distinguishing past, present and future threats. In SIS, these are added to each threat after the relevant threats have been selected. Timing, Scope and Severity are drop down lists where only one option can be selected whereas for Stresses multiple options can be selected.
7. Narrative text about the important conservation measures in place and needed. For taxa listed as Extinct in the Wild, Critically Endangered, Vulnerable, Near Threatened, and where appropriate, Data Deficient. Useful to support and provide explanation and context for coding of conservation actions.  
8. Coding of important conservation actions in place and needed. For taxa listed as Extinct in the Wild, Critically Endangered, Endangered, Vulnerable, Near threatened, and where appropriate, Data Deficient. Useful for providing a high-level indication of the most important actions in place and likely to be required, both for individual species and in multi-species analyses. These codes complement rather than pre-empt or replace more detailed Action Planning or Systematic Conservation Planning. Coding up conservation actions is not Required for Data Deficient taxa, but if possible these taxa should be coded where appropriate.
9. Narrative text on the utilization of the taxon. For utilized taxa. Useful to support and provide explanation and context for coding of utilization.  
10. Coding of the end use (purpose) and scale of utilization of the taxon. For utilized taxa. Useful for providing a high-level indication of the most important ways in which species are utilized, both for individual species and in multi-species analyses.