News Release

Celebrate 2010, the International Year of Biodiversity, with 'Species of the Day'

29 December 2009
IUCN Red List Species of the Day. Photo © K. Pintus.

The United Nations has declared 2010 the International Year of Biodiversity (IYB). Biodiversity is the backbone of all life on Earth, and its conservation lies at the very core of IUCN’s work.

With mounting scientific evidence of a serious extinction crisis, it’s time to take action. “The latest analysis of the IUCN Red List shows the 2010 target to reduce biodiversity loss will not be met,” says Jane Smart, Director of IUCN’s Biodiversity Conservation Group. “It’s time for governments to get serious about saving species and make sure it’s high on their agendas for next year, as we’re rapidly running out of time.”
 
In order to increase awareness of the enormous variety of life, and raise the profile of threatened species across the globe, we will be launching The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species™ “Species of the Day” in January.

To coincide with the IYB, for each day of 2010 this exciting new venture will see a different species being featured on a range of websites and through various other media channels. The 365 species selected will represent the entire range of groups and cover all regions, with each daily factsheet providing information on the threats to their existence. We will start by featuring some better known species, including Polar Bear, Hawksbill Turtle and Great White Shark, before moving to cover plants, fungi, invertebrates and more – both charismatic and obscure species will be featured, providing an insight into the astonishing level of biodiversity on Earth.

Partnership in action

This project is a joint project of the IUCN Species Programme and the Species Survival Commission (SSC). It has been made possible through the support of UNEP and ARKive.

 

If you are interested in the Species of the Day concept for your website, please contact Kathryn Pintus (kathryn.pintus@iucn.org) or Rachel Roberts (sscchairoffice@iucn.org).

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