Dendrolagus ursinus 

Scope: Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Diprotodontia Macropodidae

Scientific Name: Dendrolagus ursinus
Species Authority: (Temminck, 1836)
Common Name(s):
English Vogelkop Tree Kangaroo, White-throated Tree Kangaroo, Black Tree-kangaroo, Vogelkop Tree-kangaroo
French Dendrolague Noir
Spanish Canguro Arborícola Negro
Synonym(s):
Dendrolagus leucogenys Matschie, 1916

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A2cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2016
Date Assessed: 2015-06-15
Assessor(s): Leary, T., Seri, L., Wright, D., Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., Singadan, R., Menzies, J., Allison, A., James, R., Dickman, C., Aplin, K., Salas, L., Flannery, T. & Bonaccorso, F.
Reviewer(s): Johnson, C.N. & Hawkins, C.
Justification:
Listed as Vulnerable because it is suspected to have undergone at least a 30% population reduction in the last three generations (i.e., 30 years) that has not ceased, due to hunting pressures and loss of habitat.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to the island of New Guinea where it is restricted to the Vogelkop Peninsula, and possibly the Fak Fak Peninsula, of Papua Province, Indonesia (Flannery 1995). The elevation today ranges between 1,000 and 2,500 m asl. There are historical records from sea level.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Indonesia
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It is an uncommon species that is restricted primarily to the uninhabited parts of its range. It has lost a significant portion of its range (and hence population) in the last 60-70 years.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It is a montane tropical forest species, although it occurred historically in lowland forest.
Systems:Terrestrial
Generation Length (years):10

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This species is threatened by hunting by local people for food, and through loss of habitat by conversion of forest to cultivated land. Flannery (1995) indicates that it has been eliminated from the more densely populated parts of the Arfak Mountains.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix II of CITES. It occurs in one protected area. Further studies are needed into the distribution, abundance, natural history, and threats to this species.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability:Marginal  
1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability:Suitable  major importance:Yes

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
  Included in international legislation:Yes
  Subject to any international management/trade controls:Yes
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.1. Housing & urban areas
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.1. Shifting agriculture
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.1. Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals -> 5.1.1. Intentional use (species is the target)
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats

Bibliography [top]

Flannery, T.F. 1995. The Mammals of New Guinea, 2nd edition. Reed Books, Sydney, Australia.

IUCN. 2016. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2016-2. Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 04 September 2016).


Citation: Leary, T., Seri, L., Wright, D., Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., Singadan, R., Menzies, J., Allison, A., James, R., Dickman, C., Aplin, K., Salas, L., Flannery, T. & Bonaccorso, F. 2016. Dendrolagus ursinus. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T6434A21956516. . Downloaded on 06 December 2016.
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