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Daubentonia madagascariensis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES DAUBENTONIIDAE

Scientific Name: Daubentonia madagascariensis
Species Authority: (Gmelin, 1788)
Common Name/s:
English Aye-aye

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor/s: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P.
Reviewer/s: Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Near Threatened as although the species is now known to be widespread and adaptable, it is thought to have undergone a reduction of 20-25% over the past 24 years (assuming a generation length of 8 years) due primarily to a decline in area and quality of habitat and ongoing levels of exploitation/persecution. Almost qualifies as threatened under criterion A2cd.
History:
2000 Endangered
1996 Endangered
1994 Endangered (Groombridge 1994)
1990 Endangered (IUCN 1990)
1990 Endangered (IUCN 1990)
1988 Endangered (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
1986 Endangered (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is endemic to the island of Madagascar. Recent confirmed sightings document the Aye-aye's presence in eastern forests from Ampanefana in the north to Andohahela National Park in the south, and in western forests from Montagne d'Ambre in the north to at least the Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park. There is also an introduced population on the island of Nosy Mangabe and Aye-Aye island, above Mananara Nord (see Mittermeier et al. 2008 and references therein). Sea-level to 1,875 m.
Countries:
Native:
Madagascar
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: The nocturnal aye-aye is quite adaptable and is known from a variety of habitats including primary rain forest, deciduous forest, secondary growth, cultivated areas, dry scrub forest, coconut groves, and mangrove swamps; the southern spiny desert appears to be the only habitat in which the species does not occur. Its presence in many areas appears to be determined largely by its primary food resource, the seeds of ramy (Canarium spp.) although there are also other dietary staples (Mittermeier et al. 2008, and references therein).

During the day, Aye-ayes sleep in nests, tree forks or vine tangles. Nests may be occupied for a few days at a time and several individuals may use the same nest at different times. Males occupy much larger home ranges than females, 125-215 ha compared to 30-40 ha; interestingly, aye-ayes appear to spend more time moving along the ground than any other lemur except Lemur catta (Sterling 1993). Recent evidence suggests that Aye-ayes are not strictly solitary, but also forage in tandem and may exhibit differing relationships between animals of the same sex (Sterling and Richard 1995). There appears to be no restricted mating season and a single young is born. Females begin breeding at three or four years, and indications are that females give birth every two to three years (Petter and Peyrieras 1970).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Despite the Aye-aye?s widespread distribution, it is still killed as a crop pest, and a harbinger of evil, and habitat destruction remains a localized threat throughout the range. In addition, trees such as Intsia bijugia and Canarium madagascariense, which are dietary staples for this species, are also cut preferentially for the construction of boats, houses, and coffins (e.g., Iwana and Iwakawa, 1988). There is also some evidence that it is hunted for food in some areas (e.g., Makira, C. Golden pers. comm.).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix I of CITES. Daubentonia madagascariensis is reported to occur in numerous protected areas, including 12 national parks (Andohahela, Andringitra, Mamamara Nord, Mantadia, Marojejy, Masoala, Midongy du Sud, Montagne d?Ambre, Ranomafana, Tsingy de Bemaraha, Tsingy de Namoroka, Verezenantsoro, and Zahamena), and 13 special reserves (Ambatovaky, Analamazaotra, Analamerana, Anjanaharibé-Sud, Ankarana, Bora, Forêt d?Ambre, Kalambatritra, Manombo, Manongarivo, Marotandrano, Nosy Mangabe, and Pic d?Ivohibe). In addition, the Aye-aye has been sighted in the north-eastern forests of Daraina, which was declared a new protected area in 2005 (Mittermeier et al. 2008). There is a captive breeding program involving various institutions, and a EEP and an SSP.
Citation: Andrainarivo, C., Andriaholinirina, V.N., Feistner, A., Felix, T., Ganzhorn, J., Garbutt, N., Golden, C., Konstant, B., Louis Jr., E., Meyers, D., Mittermeier, R.A., Perieras, A., Princee, F., Rabarivola, J.C., Rakotosamimanana, B., Rasamimanana, H., Ratsimbazafy, J., Raveloarinoro, G., Razafimanantsoa, A., Rumpler, Y., Schwitzer, C., Thalmann, U., Wilmé, L. & Wright, P. 2008. Daubentonia madagascariensis. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 19 April 2014.
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