Afrixalus fulvovittatus 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Hyperoliidae

Scientific Name: Afrixalus fulvovittatus
Species Authority: (Cope, 1860)
Common Name(s):
English Banded Banana Frog
Afrixalus vittiger Peters, 1876
Hyperolius brevipalmatus Ahl, 1931
Hyperolius leptosomus Peters, 1877
Taxonomic Notes: We follow Perret (1976), Rödel (2000) and Pickersgill (in prep.) in separating Afrixalus fulvovittatus from the so-called Afrixalus vittatus complex of Schiøtz (1999), which includes Afrixalus quadrivittatus, A. upembae and A. vittiger.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2013-07-11
Assessor(s): IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group
Reviewer(s): Stuart, S.N.
Contributor(s): Schiøtz, A., Rödel , M.-O. & Pickersgill, M.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Morris, E.J.
Listed as Least Concern in view of its relatively wide distribution, tolerance of habitat modification and its presumed large population.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2004 Least Concern (LC)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs in the hilly areas of the West African forest zone in Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. It has also recently been recorded from Ghana in the Ankasa Conservation Area (ACA) a twin wildlife protected area comprised of Nini-Suhien National Park to the north and the Ankasa Forest Reserve to the south. The distributional limits of this species, especially in relation to Afrixalus vittiger, remain largely unknown, and the map should be regarded as provisional.
Countries occurrence:
Côte d'Ivoire; Ghana; Guinea; Liberia; Sierra Leone
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It is a common species.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It occurs widely in degraded former forest (farm bush) in the forest zone. It is not found in primary or even secondary forest. The eggs are deposited on folded leaves above water, and the tadpoles fall into ponds where they develop.
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

There are no reports of this species being utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no obvious threats, though local populations might be impacted by very severe habitat clearance.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It probably occurs in several protected areas.

Classifications [top]

2. Savanna -> 2.2. Savanna - Moist
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.4. Wetlands (inland) - Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.7. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.8. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.3. Artificial/Terrestrial - Plantations
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.4. Artificial/Terrestrial - Rural Gardens
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.6. Artificial/Terrestrial - Subtropical/Tropical Heavily Degraded Former Forest
suitability: Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Unknown
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

Bibliography [top]

Channing, A. and Howell, K.M. 2006. Amphibians of East Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.

IUCN. 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2013.2). Available at: (Accessed: 13 November 2013).

Perret, J.-L. 1976. Identite de quelques Afrixalus (Amphibia, Salienta, Hyperoliidae). Bulletin de la Societe Neuchateloise des Sciences Naturelles: 19-28.

Pickersgill, M. 2000. The ethology and systematics of eastern and southern African savanna Afrixalus (Anura: Hyperoliidae). Unpublished MSc thesis, University of Leeds.

Rödel, M.-O. 2000. Herpetofauna of the West Africa. Volume 1. Amphibians of the West African Savannas. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.

Rödel, M.-O. 2003. The amphibians of Mont Sangbé National Park, Ivory Coast. Salamandra: 91-110.

Rödel, M.-O. and Bangoura, M.A. 2004. A conservation assessment of amphibians in the Forêt Classée du Pic de Fon, Simandou Range, southeastern Republic of Guinea, with the description of a new Amnirana species (Amphibia, Anura, Ranidae). Tropical Zoology: 201-232.

Rödel, M.-O., Gil, M., Agyei, A.C., Leaché, A.D., Diaz, R.E., Fujita, M.K. and Ernst, R. 2005. The amphibians of the forested parts of south-western Ghana. Salamandra: 107-127.

Schiøtz, A. 1964. A preliminary list of amphibians collected in Ghana. Videnskabelige Meddelelser fra Dansk Naturhistorisk Forening: 1-17.

Schiøtz, A. 1967. The treefrogs (Rhacophoridae) of West Africa. Spolia Zoologica Musei Hauniensi 25: 1-346.

Schiøtz, A. 1974. Revision of the genus Afrixalus (Anura) in eastern Africa. Videnskabelige Meddelelser fra Dansk Naturhistorisk Forening: 9-18.

Schiøtz, A. 1975. The Treefrogs of Eastern Africa. Steenstrupia, Copenhagen.

Schiøtz, A. 1999. Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.

Citation: IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group. 2013. Afrixalus fulvovittatus. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T56064A18369490. . Downloaded on 29 November 2015.
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