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Abies balsamea var. balsamea

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
PLANTAE TRACHEOPHYTA PINOPSIDA PINALES PINACEAE

Scientific Name: Abies balsamea var. balsamea
Parent Species:

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2011-03-03
Assessor/s: Farjon, A.
Reviewer/s: Thomas, P. & Stritch, L.
Justification:
This is the most widespread species of Abies in North America. It is a component of the great Boreal forest of Canada, a dynamic ecosystem that is destroyed locally by natural causes but regenerates continuously. The typical variety, is assessed as Least Concern.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Recorded from Canada, North Central and E USA: south to Virginia. The extent of occurrence and area of occupancy are well beyond 20,000 km2 and 2,000 km2 respectively. Several reports and specimen databases of herbaria list occurrences of variety phanerolepis in Canada (e.g. Nova Scotia at the Harvard Herbaria) but these are likely to be just forms of A. balsamea var. balsamea with (slightly) exserted bracts.
Countries:
Native:
Canada (Alberta, Labrador, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland I, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward I., Québec, Saskatchewan); United States (Connecticut, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Very common.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Abies balsamea occurs from lowland plains to upland hills and mountains in the vast Boreal forest of North America, from sea level to 1,200 m a.s.l. in West Virginia, with an isolated station on Mt. Washington (NH) at ca. 1,900 m. It is most common on usually podzolized moderately acid soils in silt or sand. In some areas it may also grow on wet, peaty soil. The climate is cold continental in the interior, cool maritime in the eastern part of the range, with precipitation between 250 and 1,250 mm and very cold winters. The growing season ranges from 80 days in the interior of Canada to 180 days in the Appalachian Mountains. It is a constituent of coniferous forests with Picea spp., Pinus strobus, Tsuga canadensis and sometimes Pinus banksiana, or it grows mixed with broad-leaved trees such as Populus tremuloides, Betula spp. and, further south, Acer spp., Fagus grandifolia and Betula alleghaniensis. Taxus canadensis is the most common conifer shrub in these mixed forests.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): No specific threats have been identified for this variety.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species occurs in many protected areas.
Citation: Farjon, A. 2013. Abies balsamea var. balsamea. In: IUCN 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 24 April 2014.
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