Ischnura senegalensis 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Arthropoda Insecta Odonata Coenagrionidae

Scientific Name: Ischnura senegalensis
Species Authority: (Rambur, 1842)
Regional Assessments:
Common Name(s):
English Tropical Bluetail
Synonym(s):
Agrion senegalense Rambur, 1842
Enallagma brevispina Selys, 1876
Taxonomic Source(s): Schorr, M. and Paulson, D. 2015. World Odonata List. Tacoma, Washington, USA Available at: http://www.pugetsound.edu/academics/academic-resources/slater-museum/biodiversity-resources/dragonflies/world-odonata-list2/. (Accessed: 10 July 2015).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2010-01-24
Assessor(s): Sharma, G.
Reviewer(s): Allen, D., Dow, R.A., Clausnitzer, V. & García, N.
Contributor(s): Boudot, J.-P., Schneider, W. & Samraoui, B.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Alomari, K.
Justification:
Ischnura senegalensis is a very widespread and common species that occupies a broad range of habitats and is tolerant to disturbance and pollution. It is assessed as Least Concern.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2010 Least Concern (LC)
2006 Least Concern (LC)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Ischnura senegalensis is extremely widespread in tropical and subtropical parts of the old world, extending from Africa to Japan and south to western New Guinea. Within political Europe, it is known only from a minute colony in Tenerife (Canary Islands, Spain). It is lacking from areas with intact forest cover.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Afghanistan; Angola (Angola, Angola); Bangladesh; Benin; Botswana; Brunei Darussalam; Burkina Faso; Burundi; Cambodia; Cameroon; Cape Verde; Chad; China (Nei Mongol); Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Egypt (Egypt (African part), Sinai); Equatorial Guinea (Annobón); Ethiopia; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Hong Kong; India; Indonesia (Bali, Jawa, Kalimantan, Lesser Sunda Is., Maluku, Papua, Sulawesi, Sumatera); Iran, Islamic Republic of; Iraq; Israel; Japan; Jordan; Kenya; Lao People's Democratic Republic; Lesotho; Liberia; Libya; Macao; Madagascar; Malawi; Malaysia; Mali; Mauritania; Mauritius (Mauritius (main island), Rodrigues); Mayotte; Mozambique; Myanmar; Namibia (Caprivi Strip, Namibia (main part)); Niger; Oman; Pakistan; Palestinian Territory, Occupied; Papua New Guinea (Papua New Guinea (main island group)); Philippines; Réunion; Rwanda; Saudi Arabia; Senegal; Seychelles; Sierra Leone; Singapore; Somalia; South Africa (Eastern Cape Province, Free State, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo Province, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape Province, North-West Province, Western Cape); South Sudan; Spain (Canary Is.); Sri Lanka; Sudan; Swaziland; Taiwan, Province of China; Tanzania, United Republic of; Thailand; Timor-Leste; Togo; Turkmenistan; Uganda; United Arab Emirates; Uzbekistan; Viet Nam; Yemen (North Yemen, Socotra, South Yemen); Zambia; Zimbabwe
Upper elevation limit (metres):3100
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This is an extremely common species over much of its range.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No
Continuing decline in subpopulations:No
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations:UnknownAll individuals in one subpopulation:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species is highly ubiquitous and occupies a variety of stagnant and slow-flowing water bodies, up to 3,100 m asl. It is salt and pollution tolerant (e.g. coastal lagoons, pools in desert areas, polluted streams and rivers).
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:No
Movement patterns:Nomadic

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: This species is not utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This species is not threatened at the global scale, although local decreases and extinction may occur due to habitat destruction and water pollution.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: No conservation actions are needed for this species.

Classifications [top]

5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.2. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent/Irregular Rivers/Streams/Creeks
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.3. Wetlands (inland) - Shrub Dominated Wetlands
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.4. Wetlands (inland) - Bogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.5. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Freshwater Lakes (over 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.6. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent Freshwater Lakes (over 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.7. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.8. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.9. Wetlands (inland) - Freshwater Springs and Oases
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.14. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Saline, Brackish or Alkaline Lakes
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.16. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Saline, Brackish or Alkaline Marshes/Pools
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.17. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent Saline, Brackish or Alkaline Marshes/Pools
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.1. Artificial/Aquatic - Water Storage Areas (over 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.2. Artificial/Aquatic - Ponds (below 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.3. Artificial/Aquatic - Aquaculture Ponds
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.7. Artificial/Aquatic - Irrigated Land (includes irrigation channels)
suitability: Suitable  
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.9. Artificial/Aquatic - Canals and Drainage Channels, Ditches
suitability: Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education

Bibliography [top]

Dumont, H.J. and Al-Safadi, M.M. 1993. Further additions to the Dragonfly Fauna of the Republic of Yemen (Odonata). Opuscula zoologica fluminensia. 109: 1–8.

Feulner, G.R., Reimer, R.W. and Hornby, R.J. 2007. An updated illustrated checklist of dragonflies and damselflies of the UAE. Tribulus 17: 37-62.

IUCN. 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2013.1). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 12 June 2013).

Kimmins, D.E. 1961. The Odonata and Neuroptera of the Island of Socotra. Annals and Magazine of Natural History 13th series. 3: 385–-392.

Krupp, F., Apel, M., Hamoud, A., Schneider, W. and Zajonz, U. 2006. Zoological survey in the Red Sea coastal zone of Yemen. Fauna of Arabia 21: 11-32.

Martiré, D. 2010. Les Libellules et Ephémères de La Réunion. Biotope (collection Parthenope) and Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Mèze.

Meurgey, F. (coord.). 2006. Les Odonates des Départements et Collectivités d'outre-mer français. Société française d'Odonatologie, Versailles.

Reimer, R.W., Feulner, G.R. and Hornby, R.J., 2009. Errata and addenda: updated illustrated checklist of dragonflies of the UAE – including a third species of Ischnura damselfly. Tribulus 18: 28-39.

Riservato, E. et al. 2010. A contribution to the knowledge of the odonatofauna of the Socotra Archipelago (Yemen). Zoology in the Middle East 50: 101-106.

Schneider, W. and Dumont, H.J. 1997. The dragonflies and damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) of Oman. An updated and annotated checklist. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 16: 89-110.

Schneider, W. and Dumont, H.J. 1998. Checklist of the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Soqotra Island (Insecta: Odonata). First International Scientific Symposium on Socotra Island: present and future 1: 211-231. Aden, 1996.

Shalaby, F. 1961. A preliminary survey of the insect fauna of Saudi Arabia. Bulletin de la Société Entomologique d'Egypte 45: 211-228.

UEA natur forum. 2010-2012. Available at: http://www.uaebirding.com/forum/.

Van der Weide, M.J.T. and Kalkman, V.J. 2008. Some new records of dragonflies from Oman. Agrion, Newsletter of the Worldwide Dragonfly Association 12 : 52-54.

Waterston, A.R. 1980. Insects of Saudi Arabia. Odonata. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 2: 57–70.

Waterston, A.R. 1984. Insects of Southern Arabia. Odonata from the Yemens and Saudi Arabia. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 6: 451–472

Waterston, A.R. and Pittaway, A.R. 1991 (1989). The Odonata or Dragonflies of Oman and neighbouring territories. Journal of Oman Studies 10: 131-168.


Citation: Sharma, G. 2013. Ischnura senegalensis. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T59897A17530443. . Downloaded on 10 February 2016.
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