Afrixalus laevis 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Hyperoliidae

Scientific Name: Afrixalus laevis
Species Authority: (Ahl, 1930)
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2013. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 5.6 (9 January 2013). Electronic Database. American Museum of Natural History, New York, USA. Available at:

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2013-06-24
Assessor(s): IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group
Reviewer(s): Stuart, S.N.
Contributor(s): Schiøtz, A., Amiet, J.-L. & Fretey, T.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Morris, E.J.
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution and presumed large population.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2004 Least Concern (LC)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs in southwestern and southern Cameroon, south to northeastern Gabon (at M'passa) east to eastern Democratic Republic of Congo and southwestern Uganda. It is also recorded from the island Bioko (Equatorial Guinea) (R.C. Drewes pers. comm.). There do not appear to be records from Central African Republic, Congo, though it presumably occurs in these countries and they are included on the species distribution on the map. It is also likely to occur in Rwanda and Equatorial Guinea (mainland).
Countries occurrence:
Cameroon; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Equatorial Guinea; Gabon; Uganda
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It is reasonably common in suitable habitat in Cameroon, but it is rare in Kibale Forest, Uganda, where it is on the edge of its range.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It is confined to forest interior, and does not occur in altered habitats. The eggs are deposited on a leaf (which is not folded) near flowing water (unusually for Afrixalus species which usually breed in still water).
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

There are no reports of this species being utilized.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Local populations are no doubt affected by forest loss as a result of agricultural encroachment, expanding human settlements, and removal of wood.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in several protected areas.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Unknown
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.1. Housing & urban areas
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.1. Shifting agriculture
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

Bibliography [top]

Amiet, J.-L. 1986. La Batrachofaune sylvicole d'un secteur forestier du Cameroun: la région de Yaounde. Mémoires du Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle: 29-42.

Amiet, J.-L. 1989. Quelques aspects de la biologie des Amphibiens Anoures du Cameroun. Année Biologique: 73-136.

Amiet, J.-L. 1991. Images d'amphibiens camerounais. IV. Les constructeurs de nids. Alytes: 71-77.

Channing, A. and Howell, K.M. 2006. Amphibians of East Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.

Drewes, R.C. and Vindum, J.V. 1994. Amphibians of the impenetrable forest, Southwest Uganda. Journal of African Zoology: 55-70.

Frétey, T. and Blanc, C.P. 2000. Liste des Amphibiens d'Afrique Centrale. ADIE, Libreville, Gabon.

Herrmann, H.-W., Böhme, W., Herrmann, P.A., Plath, M., Schmitz, A. and Solbach, M. 2005. African Biodiversity Hotspots: the amphibians of Mt. Nlonako, Cameroon. Salamandra 41(1/2): 61-81.

IUCN. 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2013.2). Available at: (Accessed: 13 November 2013).

Laurent, R.F. 1972. Amphibiens. Exploration du Parc National des Virunga, 2e Ser.: 1-125.

Laurent, R.F. 1982. Le genre Afrixalus Laurent (Hyperoliidae) en Afrique Centrale. Annales Musée Royal de l'Afrique Centrale, Sciences Zoologiques: 1-58.

Lawson, D.P. 1993. The reptiles and amphibians of the Korup National Park Project, Cameroon. Herpetological Natural History: 27-90.

Perret, J.-L. 1960. Batraciens du genre Afrixalus du Cameroun. Rev. Zool. Bot. Afr.: 365-374.

Perret, J.-L. 1966. Les Amphibiens du Cameroun. Zoologische Jahrbuecher fuer Systematik: 289-464.

Schiøtz, A. 1999. Treefrogs of Africa. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt am Main.

Vonesh, J. 2001. Natural history and biogeography of the amphibians and reptiles of Kibale National Park, Uganda. Contemporary Herpetology.

Citation: IUCN SSC Amphibian Specialist Group. 2013. Afrixalus laevis. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T56067A18370863. . Downloaded on 30 November 2015.
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