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Thamnophis scaliger 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Reptilia Squamata Natricidae

Scientific Name: Thamnophis scaliger
Species Authority: (Jan, 1863)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable B1ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2007
Date Assessed: 2007-03-01
Assessor(s): Canseco-Márquez, L., Mendoza-Quijano, F. & Gustavo Quintero Díaz
Reviewer(s): Cox, N., Chanson, J.S. & Stuart, S.N. (Global Reptile Assessment Coordinating Team)
Justification:
Listed as Vulnerable because its extent of occurrence is less than 20,000 km², it is known from fewer than ten locations, it is severely fragmented in parts of its range, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is endemic to central Mexico. It is present as isolated highland populations in the Central Plateau and the volcanic belt. It has been recorded from Michoacan, Aguascalientes, State of Mexico and the Distrito Federal. It has an elevational range of 2,230 to 3,000 m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Mexico
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It is an uncommon species.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: The species is associated with streams and small canyons in semi-arid dry grasslands, shrubland and oak forest. It can be found in secondary habitats including agricultural areas, such as cattle pasture. It is a viviparous species.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It is threatened by extensive habitat conversion to agricultural use. Populations can remain in areas with some limited habitat conversion.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is not known to occur in any protected areas. There is a need to establish protected areas for this species. Further research is needed into the ecology, natural history and population of this species.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.5. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  
3. Shrubland -> 3.5. Shrubland - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  
4. Grassland -> 4.5. Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.7. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Freshwater Marshes/Pools (under 8ha)
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.2. Artificial/Terrestrial - Pastureland
suitability: Marginal  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.3. Agro-industry farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.2. Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.3. Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

IUCN. 2007. 2007 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 12th September 2007).

Queiroz, A. de, Lawson, R. and Lemos-Espinal, J.A. 2002. Phylogenetic Relationships of North American Garter Snakes (Thamnophis) Based on Four Mitochondrial Genes: How Much DNA Sequence Is Enough? Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 22: 315-329.

Quintero-Díaz, G., Vázquez-Díaz, J. and Smith, H.M. 1999. Geographic distribution: Thamnophis scaliger. Herpetological Review 30(4): 237.

Rossman, D.A. and Gongora, G.L. 1997. Variation in the Mexican garter snake Thamnophis scalaris Cope and the taxonomic status of T. scaliger (Jan). Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural History Sci., Lousiana State University 74: 1-14.

Rossman, D.A., Ford, N.B. and Seigel, R.A. 1996. The Garter Snakes. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, Oklahoma and London, UK.


Citation: Canseco-Márquez, L., Mendoza-Quijano, F. & Gustavo Quintero Díaz. 2007. Thamnophis scaliger. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2007: e.T63993A12727823. . Downloaded on 11 February 2016.
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