Trachylepis vittata 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Reptilia Squamata Scincidae

Scientific Name: Trachylepis vittata
Species Authority: (Olivier, 1804)
Regional Assessments:
Common Name(s):
English Bridled Mabuya, Bridled Skink
Euprepes vittatus (Olivier, 1804)
Eutropis vittata (Olivier, 1804)
Hermites vittatus (Olivier, 1804)
Mabuia vittata (Olivier, 1804)
Mabuya vittata (Olivier, 1804)
Scincus vittatus Olivier, 1804

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2008-12-14
Assessor(s): Wolfgang Böhme, Jose Antonio Mateo Miras, Ulrich Joger, Tahar Slimani, El Hassan El Mouden, Philippe Geniez, Souad Hraoui-Bloquet, M. Saïd Nouira, Sherif Baha El Din, Petros Lymberakis, Yakup Kaska, Yusuf Kumlutaş, Uğur Kaya, Aziz Avci, Nazan Üzüm, Can Yeniyurt, Ferdi Akarsu
Reviewer(s): Cox, N. and Temple, H.J. (Global Reptile Assessment)
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, tolerance of a degree of habitat modification, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
Previously published Red List assessments:
2006 Least Concern (LC)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species ranges through North Africa from north-central and northeastern Algeria and central Tunisia, northern Libya and northern Egypt, central and northern Israel, western Jordan (with an isolated locality in the east), Lebanon, much of Syria, and central and southern Turkey. It also occurs on Cyprus. This species is found from sea level up to 2,500 m asl. In Turkey, it is found from sea level up to 1,000 m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Algeria; Cyprus; Egypt; Israel; Jordan; Lebanon; Libya; Syrian Arab Republic; Tunisia; Turkey
Upper elevation limit (metres): 2500
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It can be a common species, particularly in Lebanon, southern Turkey, and Cyprus. In Egypt, it is uncommon to rare.
Current Population Trend: Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found in a wide variety of habitats. It occurs in open areas of sandy or stony soil with sparse grass or bushy vegetation. Animals may also be found at the edge of fields, on the banks of irrigation canals, or in rural gardens. In Egypt is found near to wetlands and in coastal areas. In Tunisia the species is largely restricted to areas of oasis. It is an ovoviviparous species, the females give birth to between three and six young.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There appear to be no major threats to this widespread species. Populations may be locally impacted by conversion of land to agriculture or habitat loss to tourism development. There is some commercial collection of this species in Egypt.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is known from a number of protected areas throughout its range. Research into the range and collection of this species in Egypt is needed.

Classifications [top]

3. Shrubland -> 3.5. Shrubland - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  
3. Shrubland -> 3.8. Shrubland - Mediterranean-type Shrubby Vegetation
suitability: Suitable  
4. Grassland -> 4.5. Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.9. Wetlands (inland) - Freshwater Springs and Oases
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.1. Artificial/Terrestrial - Arable Land
suitability: Marginal  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.2. Artificial/Terrestrial - Pastureland
suitability: Marginal  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.4. Artificial/Terrestrial - Rural Gardens
suitability: Suitable  
15. Artificial/Aquatic & Marine -> 15.7. Artificial/Aquatic - Irrigated Land (includes irrigation channels)
suitability: Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
5. Biological resource use -> 5.1. Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals -> 5.1.1. Intentional use (species is the target)
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

1. Research -> 1.1. Taxonomy
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology

♦  Pets/display animals, horticulture
 International : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Amr, Z.S., Al-Oran, R. and Disi, A. 1994. Reptiles of southern Jordan. The Snake 26: 41-49.

Baha El Din, S. 2001. The herpetofauna of Egypt: species, communities and assemblages. Phd unpublished, University of Nottingham School of Biological Sciences, Nottingham, UK.

Baran, I. and Atatür, M.K. 1998. Turkish herpetofauna (amphibians and reptiles). Republic of Turkey Ministry of Environment, Ankara.

Baran, I., Kumlutas, Y., Olgun, K., Ilgaz, C. and Kaska, Y. 2001. The Herpetofauna of the Vicinity of Silifke. Turkish Journal of Zoology 25: 245-249.

Böhme, W. and Wiedl, H. 1994. Status and zoogeography of the herpetofauna of Cyprus, with taxonomic and natural history notes on selected species (genera Rana, Coluber, Natrix, Vipera). Zoology in the Middle East 10: 31-52.

Budack, A. 1973. A study on the individual and geographic variation of Mabuya vittata (Scincidae, Lacertilia) in Turkey. Sci. Rep. Fac. Sci. Ege Univ. Izmir 214: 1-59.

Budak, A., Tok, C.V. and Mermer, A. 1998. A Report on Reptiles Collected from Kumluca-Kalkan (Antalya), Turkey. Tr. J. of Zoology 22: 185-189.

Disi, A.M., Amr, Z.S. and Martens, H. 2004. On a collection of amphibians and reptiles made by J. Klapperich in Jordan. Herpetozoa 16(3/4): 141-150.

Disi, A.M. and Böhme, W. 1996. Zoogeography of the amphibians and reptiles of Syria, with additional new records. Herpetozoa 9(1/2): 63-70.

Disi, A.M., Modrý, D., Nečas, P. and Rifai, L. 2001. Amphibians and reptiles of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt.

Esterbauer, H. 1985. Zur Herpetofauna Südwestsyriens. Herpetofauna 7(38): 23-34.

Flower, S. 1933. Notes on the recent reptiles and amphibians of Egypt, with a list of the species recorded from that kingdom. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London 1933: 735-851.

Hraoui-Blouquet, S., Sadek, R.A., Sindaco, R. and Venchi, A. 2002. The herpetofauna of Lebanon: new data on distribution. Zoology in the Middle East 27: 35-46.

In den Bosch, H.A.J. 1998. Prodomus einer Liste der Amphibien und Reptilien Libanons Produmus Amphibiorum et Reptiliorum Phoeniciae (Amphibia; Reptilia). Faunistische Abhandlungen Staatl. Museum f. Tierkunde Dresden 21: 9-17.

IUCN. 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2009.1). Available at: (Accessed: 22 June 2009).

Lymberakis, P. and Kalionzopoulou, A. 2003. Additions to the herpetofauna of Syria. Zoology in the Middle East 29: 33-39.

Martens, H. 1997. A review of "Zoogeography of amphibians and reptiles of Syria, with additional new records" (Herpetozoa 9 (1/2), 1996). Herpetozoa 10(3/4): 99-106.

Saleh, M.A. 1997. Amphibians and Reptiles of Egypt. Publication of the National Biodiversity Unit, Cairo.

Schleich, H.H., Kästle, W. and Kabisch, K. 1996. Amphibians and Reptiles of North Africa. Koeltz, Koenigstein.

Sindaco, R. and Jeremčenko, V.K. 2008. The Reptiles of the Western Palearctic. 1. Annotated Checklist and Distributional atlas of the turtles, crocodiles, amphisbaenians and lizards of Europe, North Africa, Middle East and Central Asia. Edizioni Belvedere, Latina (Italy).

Sindaco, R., Fedringhini, N. and Venchi, A. 1995. Contribution to the herpetology of Jordan. Boll. Mus. Reg. Sci. nat. Torino 13(2): 389-405.

Sindaco, R., Venchi, A., Carpaneto, G.M. and Bologna, M.A. 2000. The reptiles of Anatolia: a checklist and zoogeographical analysis. Biogeographia 21: 441-554.

Sivan, N. and Werner, Y.L. 1992. Survey of the reptiles of the Golan Plateau and Mt. Hermon, Israel. Israel Journal of Zoology 37: 193-211.

Tok, C.V., Göçmen, B. and Mermer, A. 1999. Kuzey Kibris Türk Cumhuriyeti Mabuya vittata (Seritli Kertenkele) (Sauria : Scincidae) Örnekleri Hakkinda. Turkish Journal of Zoology 23(2): 583-589.

Uğurtaş, I.H., Yildirimhan, H.S. and Öz, M. 2000. Herpetofauna of the eastern region of the Amanos Mountains (Nur). Turk. J. Zool. 24: 257-261.

van der Winden, J., Strijbosch, H. and Bogaerts, S. 1995. Habitat related disruptive pattern distribution in the polymorphic lizard Mabuya vittata. Acta Oecologica 16(4): 423-430.

Werner, Y.L. 1971. Lizards and snakes from Transjordan, recently acquired by the British Museum (Natural Hisrory). Bulletin of the British Museum (Natural History), Zoology 21: 213-256.

Citation: Wolfgang Böhme, Jose Antonio Mateo Miras, Ulrich Joger, Tahar Slimani, El Hassan El Mouden, Philippe Geniez, Souad Hraoui-Bloquet, M. Saïd Nouira, Sherif Baha El Din, Petros Lymberakis, Yakup Kaska, Yusuf Kumlutaş, Uğur Kaya, Aziz Avci, Nazan Üzüm, Can Yeniyurt, Ferdi Akarsu. 2009. Trachylepis vittata. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2009: e.T61586A12500682. . Downloaded on 29 November 2015.
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