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Anax imperator

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA INSECTA ODONATA AESHNIDAE

Scientific Name: Anax imperator
Species Authority: Leach, 1815
Common Name(s):
English Blue Emperor, Emperor Dragonfly
French Anax Empereur
Synonym(s):
Aeschna azurea Charpentier, 1825
Aeschna lunata Kolenati, 1856
Anax formosa Vander Linden, 1823
Anax mauricianus Rambur, 1842

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2013
Date Assessed: 2009-10-15
Assessor(s): Mitra, A.
Reviewer(s): Kakkasery, F., Babu, R., Mondal, S., Brooks, E., Clausnitzer, V., Dow, R.A. & García, N.
Contributor(s): Boudot, J.-P., Samraoui, B. & Schneider, W.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Alomari, K.
Justification:
Anax imperator is a widespread species with no major threat worldwide and it is therefore assessed as Least Concern.
History:
2010 Least Concern
2006 Least Concern (IUCN 2006)
2006 Least Concern

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Anax imperator is known from the whole Africa to most of Europe, the Arabian Peninsula and southwest and Central Asia. Within India it is present in West Bengal (Kolkata district), Uttarakhand, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu. The species is presently expanding to the north due to the global warming and has been found in the southern part of Sweden up to Uppsala. In the British Isles, its northern limit shifted by 80 km to the north so that now the species is known from Scotland.
Countries:
Native:
Afghanistan; Albania; Algeria; Angola (Angola, Angola); Armenia (Armenia); Austria; Azerbaijan; Belarus; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Botswana; Bulgaria; Burundi; Cameroon; Cape Verde; Congo; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Croatia; Cyprus; Czech Republic; Denmark; Egypt (Egypt (African part), Sinai); Equatorial Guinea (Bioko, Equatorial Guinea (mainland)); Eritrea; Estonia; Ethiopia; France (Corsica, France (mainland)); Gabon; Gambia; Georgia (Abkhaziya, Adzhariya, Gruziya); Germany; Ghana; Gibraltar; Greece (East Aegean Is., Greece (mainland), Kriti); Guinea; Hungary; India (Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu, Uttaranchal, West Bengal); Iran, Islamic Republic of; Iraq; Ireland; Israel; Italy (Italy (mainland), Sardegna, Sicilia); Jordan; Kazakhstan; Kenya; Kyrgyzstan; Lebanon; Lesotho; Liberia; Libya; Lithuania; Luxembourg; Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of; Madagascar; Malawi; Mali; Malta; Mauritania; Mauritius (Mauritius (main island)); Mayotte; Moldova; Monaco; Montenegro; Morocco; Mozambique; Namibia (Caprivi Strip, Namibia (main part)); Netherlands; Niger; Nigeria; Oman; Pakistan; Palestinian Territory, Occupied; Poland; Portugal (Azores, Madeira, Portugal (mainland)); Réunion; Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, Dagestan, East European Russia, Kabardino-Balkariya, Karachaevo-Cherkessiya, Krasnodar, Severo-Osetiya, South European Russia, Stavropol); Rwanda; Sao Tomé and Principe (Sâo Tomé); Saudi Arabia; Senegal; Serbia (Serbia, Serbia); Slovakia; Slovenia; Somalia; South Africa (Eastern Cape Province, Free State, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo Province, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape Province, North-West Province, Western Cape); Spain (Canary Is., Spain (mainland)); Sudan; Swaziland; Sweden; Switzerland; Syrian Arab Republic; Tajikistan; Tanzania, United Republic of; Togo; Tunisia; Turkey (Turkey-in-Asia, Turkey-in-Europe); Turkmenistan; Uganda; Ukraine (Krym, Ukraine (main part)); United Arab Emirates; United Kingdom (Great Britain); Uzbekistan; Yemen (North Yemen, Socotra, South Yemen); Zambia; Zimbabwe
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The species is generally common and shows often large populations.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Anax imperator breeds in any kind of standing and slow running waters bordered with rushes and weeds. It is a familiar species on all open waters, where males patrol and hawk restless over their territory and exclude their congeners. Males most generally don't accompany the female during oviposition.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: No use of this species is known.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Anax imperator is not threatened at the global scale, although local declines may occur due to habitat destruction and water pollution.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This is a widespread species, and specific conservation measures are not needed.

Bibliography [top]

Al-Safadi, M.M. 1990. Dragonflies (Odonata) of the Yemen Arab Republic. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 11: 18-30.

Al-Safadi, M.M. 1995. A pilot study of lake Ma'rib, Yemen. Hydrobiologia 315: 203-209.

Dumont, H.J. and Al-Safadi, M.M. 1991. Additions to the dragonfly fauna of Yemen. Notulae odonatologicae 3: 114-117.

Dumont, H.J. and Al-Safadi, M.M. 1993. Further additions to the Dragonfly Fauna of the Republic of Yemen (Odonata). Opuscula zoologica fluminensia. 109: 1–8.

Giles, G.B. 1998. An illustrated checklist of the damselflies and dragonflies of the United Arab Emirates. Tribulus, Bulletin of the Emirates Natural History Group 8: 9-15.

IUCN. 2013. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2013.1). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 12 June 2013).

Kimmins, D.E. 1961. The Odonata and Neuroptera of the Island of Socotra. Annals and Magazine of Natural History 13th series. 3: 385–-392.

Martiré, D. 2010. Les Libellules et Ephémères de La Réunion. Biotope (collection Parthenope) and Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Mèze.

McLachlan, R. 1903. The Dragon-flies of Sokotra. In: Forbes H.O. (ed.), The Natural History of Sokotra and Abd-el-Kuri, pp. 398-403. Liverpool Museum, Liverpool.

Meurgey, F. (coord.). 2006. Les Odonates des Départements et Collectivités d'outre-mer français. Société française d'Odonatologie, Versailles.

Riservato, E. et al. 2010. A contribution to the knowledge of the odonatofauna of the Socotra Archipelago (Yemen). Zoology in the Middle East 50: 101-106.

Schneider, W. and Dumont, H.J. 1997. The dragonflies and damselflies (Insecta: Odonata) of Oman. An updated and annotated checklist. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 16: 89-110.

Schneider, W. and Dumont, H.J. 1998. Checklist of the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Soqotra Island (Insecta: Odonata). First International Scientific Symposium on Socotra Island: present and future 1: 211-231. Aden, 1996.

Schneider, W. and Krupp, F. 1993. Dragonfly records from Saudi Arabia, with an annotated checklist of the species from the Arabian Peninsula (Insecta: Odonata). Fauna of Saudi Arabia 13: 63-78.

Tourenq, C., Barcelo, I., Kumari, A. and Drew, C. 2005. The terrestrial mammals, reptiles and invertebrates of Al Wathba Wetland Reserve - A species list and status report. . Terrestrial Environment Research Centre, Environmental Research and Wildlife Development Agency, P.O. Box 45553, Abu Dhabi.

UEA natur forum. 2010-2012. Available at: http://www.uaebirding.com/forum/.

Waterston, A.R. 1984. Insects of Southern Arabia. Odonata from the Yemens and Saudi Arabia. Fauna of Saudi Arabia 6: 451–472

Waterston, A.R. and Pittaway, A.R. 1991 (1989). The Odonata or Dragonflies of Oman and neighbouring territories. Journal of Oman Studies 10: 131-168.

Wilson, K.D.P. 2008. A brief trip to United Arab Emirates and northern Oman. Agrion, newsletter of the Worldwide Dragonfly Association 12: 56-57.


Citation: Mitra, A. 2013. Anax imperator. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 20 September 2014.
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