Cucujus cinnaberinus

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_onStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA INSECTA COLEOPTERA CUCUJIDAE

Scientific Name: Cucujus cinnaberinus
Species Authority: (Scopoli, 1763)
Synonym(s):
Cucujus depressus Fabricius, 1775
Cucujus geniculatus Reitter, 1893
Cucujus sanguinolentus (Linnaeus, 1767)

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-06-05
Assessor(s): Nieto, A., Mannerkoski, I., Putchkov, A., Tykarski, P., Mason, F., Dodelin, B., Horák, J. & Tezcan, S.
Reviewer(s): Nieto, A. & Alexander, K.
Justification:

European regional assessment: listed as Near Threatened because although the species appears to be expanding in central Europe, the species is declining rapidly in the surrounding areas due to habitat loss, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable.

EU 27 regional assessment: listed as Near Threatened because although the species appears to be expanding in central Europe, the species is declining rapidly in the surrounding areas due to habitat loss, thus making the species close to qualifying for Vulnerable.

History:
1996 Vulnerable
1994 Endangered (Groombridge 1994)
1990 Endangered (IUCN 1990)
1988 Endangered (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1988)
1986 Endangered (IUCN Conservation Monitoring Centre 1986)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is found throughout much of Europe but it is largely absent in the south and west. The strongest populations are in central Europe. In Hungary this species is widespread all over the country wherever wooded plant societies occur (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In Italy it has been recorded from three sites in the south (Ratti 2006). In Finland only two or three populations exist. A single locality is known in Spain, from the 1960s (Español 1963); it has never been found again.

Luce (1996) suggests that sites in southern Europe are mistaken identifications of C. haematodes, although he provides no evidence in support of this opinion. Both species are recorded from Italy, which suggests that the records are genuine.
Countries:
Native:
Austria; Belarus; Czech Republic; Estonia; Finland; Germany; Hungary; Italy (Italy (mainland)); Latvia; Lithuania; Moldova; Norway; Poland; Romania; Russian Federation (Central European Russia, Northwest European Russia); Slovakia; Slovenia; Sweden; Ukraine (Ukraine (main part))
Possibly extinct:
Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; Croatia; Montenegro; Serbia (Kosovo - Native, Serbia - Native, Serbia); Spain (Spain (mainland))
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The species is expanding in central-eastern Europe but declining in the surrounding areas. In the Czech Republic there are strong populations due to withering poplar plantations; it is the same situation in most parts of central Europe. In Germany, in the eastern part it seems common. In Hungary populations in hilly and mountainous broad-leaved forests and indigenous or planted pine forests are mostly small; populations in riverine willow galleries and indigenous or planted poplar plantations are often much stronger (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In Ukraine it is considered very rare.

In Spain two specimens were collected in a single locality in the 1960s and it has never been found again (Español 1963). Very rare or presumably extinct in Spain (M. Méndez pers. comm. 2009).
Population Trend: Increasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This is an obligate saproxylic species. Larvae and adults live under bark of deadwood of a variety of broad-leaved trees: Quercus, Acer, Populus, and rarely Pinus. The adults and larvae are saproxylophagous, feeding on the decaying wood, but are sometimes reported as necrophagous or predatory (A. Putchkov pers. comm. 2009). The species needs open spaces and prefers lowland areas with soft-wooded broad-leaves. The adults and older stages of larvae hibernate under bark on the deadwood. In Romania larvae develop under very decayed bark of aspen Populus tremula trees with the fungi Aspergillus, Trichoderma, Ceratocystis etc. The adult is active in May - June. Young beetles appear in July - August (Nikitsky et al. 1996). In Hungary it occurs in all kinds of indigenous and planted forests, including hilly and mountainous broad-leaved forests, pine, poplar and black locust tree plantations, city parks, alleys or in solitary trees along roads (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In Finland it lives in old-growth forests in old aspen trees.
Systems: Terrestrial

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Saproxylic Coleoptera tend to be popular with beetle collectors although trade is rarely an issue, the only exceptions being a few larger species of more dramatic form or colour.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

The main overall threat is degradation or loss of habitat quality, involving structural changes in the tree populations arising from changing land use – affecting age structures and tree density. Exploitation from forestry is often a key immediate issue, but equally damaging can be long-term changes towards canopy closure as a result of non- or minimum-intervention management systems. Fragmentation and increasing isolation of beetle populations are also key factors.In Hungary removal of dead wood is a key threat, but the species is widespread and quickly colonizes new habitats (O. Merkl pers. comm. 2009). In Ukraine a negative factor is the felling and destruction of old trees. In Finland populations are within protected areas, but the species is threatened by insufficient continuum of large aspen and poor possibilities of colonizing new areas.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix II of the Bern Convention and Annex II and IV of the EU Habitats Directive. It is accordingly legally protected in many countries, for example in Hungary. The species occurs in several  protected areas (e.g. Hungary, Finland). In Finland it is listed as Critically Endangered and in Poland as Least Concern. It is planned to included this species in the Red Book of Ukraine.

Bibliography [top]

Alexandrovitch O.R., Lopatin I.K., Pisanenko A.D., Tsinkevitch V.A. and Snitko S.M. 1996. A Catalogue of Coleoptera (Insecta) of Belarus. FFI RB, Minsk.

Español, F. 1963. Sobre algunos Cucujidae españoles (Coleoptera). Graellsia 20(1-3): 119-124.

Groombridge, B. (ed.). 1994. 1994 IUCN Red List of Threatened Animals. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN. 1990. IUCN Red List of Threatened Animals. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.1). Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 10 March 2010).

Luce J.-M. 1996. Cucujus cinnabarinus (Scopoli, 1774). In: Helsdingen P.J. van, Willemse L., & Speight M.C.D. (ed.), Background information on invertebrates of the Habitats Directive and the Bern Convention, pp. 27-30. Council of Europe, Strasbourg.

Nikitsky, N.B., Osipov, I.N., Chemeris, M.V., Semenov, V.B. and Gusakov A.A. 1996. The beetles of priokskoterrasny biosphere reserve - Xylobiontes, Mycetobiontes and Scarabaeidae. Arch. Zool. Mus. Moscow Univ. 36: 198.

Ratti E. 2006. Insecta Coleptera Cucujidae Cucujus. In: Ruffo S., Stoch F. (ed.), Checklist and distribution of the Italian fauna, pp. CD-ROM. Memorie del Museo Civico di Storia Naturale di Verona, Verona.


Citation: Nieto, A., Mannerkoski, I., Putchkov, A., Tykarski, P., Mason, F., Dodelin, B., Horák, J. & Tezcan, S. 2010. Cucujus cinnaberinus. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 October 2014.
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