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Hyloscirtus lindae 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Hylidae

Scientific Name: Hyloscirtus lindae
Species Authority: (Duellman and Altig, 1978)
Taxonomic Notes: This species was previously included in the genus Hyla but has recently been moved to the resurrected genus Hyloscirtus (Faivovich et al. 2005).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable B1ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2008-10-27
Assessor(s): Diego Almeida, Wilmar Bolívar, Luis A. Coloma, Santiago Ron
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Justification:
Listed as Vulnerable because its Extent of Occurrence is less than 20,000 km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its forest habitat in the Ecuadorian and Colombian Andes.
Previously published Red List assessments:
  • 2004 – Vulnerable (VU)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs on the Amazonian slopes of the Andes in southern Colombia (in Caquetá and Putumayo Departments) and Ecuador (south to Morona Province). It ranges from 2,000-2,600m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Colombia; Ecuador
Additional data:
Lower elevation limit (metres):2000
Upper elevation limit (metres):2600
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:It is a common species.
Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It lives in upper humid montane forest, and it also survives in pastureland and other altered habitats. However, although it is adaptable, it probably cannot tolerate extremely severe habitat clearance, leading to a very open landscape. It is associated with creeks and breeds in streams. Individuals have been found on vegetation along small creeks within forests; tadpoles have been collected in bodies of water with limited movement (Mueses-Cisneros, 2005).
Systems:Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The major threats are habitat loss from agricultural development, planting of illegal crops, logging, and human settlement, and pollution resulting from the spraying of illegal crops. The species has a narrow altitudinal range, and lives in habitats where catastrophic extinctions have occurred in other frog species with stream-dwelling tadpoles, perhaps due to chytridiomycosis. Mueses-Cisneros (2005) reports that all tadpoles examined in his study lack keratin in their mouthparts; however, he suggests that this is not necessarily related to chytrid infection.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in several protected areas in Ecuador, including Parque Nacional Llanganates and Parque Nacional Sangay, but is apparently not recorded from any in Colombia. There is a need for close population monitoring of this species, given the potential threat of chytridiomycosis.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.2. Artificial/Terrestrial - Pastureland
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.4. Artificial/Terrestrial - Rural Gardens
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.6. Artificial/Terrestrial - Subtropical/Tropical Heavily Degraded Former Forest
suitability: Suitable  
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.1. Housing & urban areas
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.2. Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.3. Agro-industry grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

8. Invasive & other problematic species & genes -> 8.1. Invasive non-native/alien species -> 8.1.2. Named species (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis)
♦ timing: Future    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.4. Type Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

Duellman, W.E. and Altig, R. 1978. New species of tree frogs (family Hylidae) from the Andes of Colombia and Ecuador. Herpetologica: 177-185.

Duellman, W.E. and Hillis, D.M. 1990. Systematics of frogs of the Hyla larinopygion group. Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural History of the University of Kansas: 1-23.

Faivovich, J., Haddad, C.F.B., Garcia, P.C.O., Frost, D.R., Campbell, J.A. and Wheeler, W.C. 2005. Systematic review of the frog family Hylidae, with special reference to Hylinae: Phylogenetic analysis and taxonomic revision. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 294: 1-240.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.2). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 29 June 2010).

Mueses-Cisneros, J.J. 2005. Fauna Anfibia del Valle de Sibundoy, Putumayo-Colombia. The Amphibian Fauna of the Valle de Sibundoy, Putumayo-Colombia. Caldasia 27(2): 229-242.

Ruiz-Carranza, P.M. and Lynch, J.D. 1982. Dos nuevas especies de Hyla (Amphibia: Anura) de Colombia, con aportes al conocimiento de Hyla bogotensis. Caldasia: 647-671.

Ruiz-Carranza, P.M., Ardila-Robayo, M.C. and Lynch, J.D. 1996. Lista actualizada de la fauna de Amphibia de Colombia. Revista de la Academia Colombiana de Ciencias Exactas, Físicas y Naturales 20(77): 365-415.


Citation: Diego Almeida, Wilmar Bolívar, Luis A. Coloma, Santiago Ron. 2010. Hyloscirtus lindae. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T55540A11329580. . Downloaded on 29 July 2016.
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