Melanophryniscus devincenzii 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Amphibia Anura Bufonidae

Scientific Name: Melanophryniscus devincenzii
Species Authority: Klappenbach, 1968
Common Name(s):
English Rivera Redbelly Toad
Taxonomic Source(s): Frost, D.R. 2014. Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6 (27 January 2014). New York, USA. Available at: (Accessed: 27 January 2014).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B2ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2004
Date Assessed: 2004-04-30
Needs updating
Assessor(s): Esteban Lavilla, Diego Baldo, Jose Langone
Reviewer(s): Global Amphibian Assessment Coordinating Team (Simon Stuart, Janice Chanson, Neil Cox and Bruce Young)
Listed as Endangered because its Area of Occupancy is less than 500km2, its distribution is severely fragmented, and there is continuing decline in the extent and quality of its habitat in Argentina and Uruguay.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species occurs in the southern part of Misiones Province, Argentina, and Rivera, Tacuarembó, and Cerro Largo Departments in Uruguay at elevations of 150-350m asl.
Countries occurrence:
Argentina; Uruguay
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It is very rare in Misiones (Argentina) where males have been found (in 1998 and 2003) in amplexus with females of other species, possibly because of a lack of conspecifics. The population status of the species in Uruguay is unknown.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It occurs in open areas with rocky outcrops, but also occurs in the ecotones between grasslands and forests of Astronium balansae. In Uruguay, it has been found in eucalyptus plantations. Nothing is known about its breeding habits, other than that males have been found in amplexus in temporary streams and the larvae presumably develop in streams.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The pollution of soil and water due to agricultural practices is a known threat to this species. In Misiones, it is also threatened by the conversion of native habitat to pine plantations.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It occurs in small provincial parks in Argentina, including Fachinal and the Campos San Juan private reserves. Broad-scale conservation actions are necessary to combat the effects of pollution on its breeding habitat.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability: Marginal  
4. Grassland -> 4.6. Grassland - Subtropical/Tropical Seasonally Wet/Flooded
suitability: Suitable  
5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.2. Wetlands (inland) - Seasonal/Intermittent/Irregular Rivers/Streams/Creeks
suitability: Suitable  
0. Root -> 6. Rocky areas (eg. inland cliffs, mountain peaks)
suitability: Suitable  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.3. Artificial/Terrestrial - Plantations
suitability: Marginal  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management
2. Land/water management -> 2.3. Habitat & natural process restoration

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.3. Agro-industry farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.2. Wood & pulp plantations -> 2.2.2. Agro-industry plantations
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.4. Type Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
1. Research -> 1.6. Actions
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

IUCN. 2004. 2004 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Downloaded on 23 November 2004.

Langone, J.A. 1994. Ranas y sapos del Uruguay (Reconocimiento y aspectos biologicos). Museo Damaso Antonio Larranaga (Divulgacion): 1-123.

Lavilla, E.O. and Cei, J.M. 2001. Amphibians of Argentina. A second update, 1987-2000. Monogr. Mus. Reg. Sci. Nat. Torino (Italia), Torino, Italy.

Lavilla, E.O., Barrionuevo, S. and Baldo, D. 2002. Los anfibios insuficientamente conocidos de la Republica Argentina. Una reevaluacion. Cuadernos de Herpetología: 99-118.

Lavilla, E.O., Ponssa, M.L., Baldo, D., Basso, N., Bosso, A., Cespedez, J., Chebez, J.C., Faivovich, J., Ferrari, L., Lajmanovich, R., Langone, J.A., Peltzer, P., Ubeda, C., Vaira, M. and Vera Candioti, F. 2000. Categorización de los Anfibios de Argentina. Categorización de los Anfibios y Reptiles de la República Argentina: 11-34.

Maneyro, R. and Langone, J.A. 2001. Categorizacion de los anfibios del Uruguay. Cuadernos de Herpetología: 107-118.

Citation: Esteban Lavilla, Diego Baldo, Jose Langone. 2004. Melanophryniscus devincenzii. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2004: e.T54819A11208647. . Downloaded on 27 November 2015.
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