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Ceratozamia mexicana 

Scope: Global
Language: English
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Plantae Tracheophyta Cycadopsida Cycadales Zamiaceae

Scientific Name: Ceratozamia mexicana Brongn.
Common Name(s):
Spanish costilla de león, palma imperial, piña del monte
Synonym(s):
Ceratozamia intermedia Miq.
Ceratozamia longifolia Miq.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A2acd+4cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-10-31
Assessor(s): Vazquez, M., Bojorquez, H., Torres, L., Sanchez-Moreno, S., Sanchez-Morales, L. & Torres-Hernandez, L.
Reviewer(s): Donaldson, J.S. & Bösenberg, J.D.
Justification:
Classified as Vulnerable based on known decline in habitat over the past 50 years (ca. two generations) of 30-50%. In some places populations have declined by as much as 90% due to land clearing, but overall decline appears to be between 30% and 50%.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species occurs in the Hidalgo, Puebla, San Luis Potosí, Querétaro and Veracruz states of Mexico and are found widely distributed from low to moderate elevations.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Mexico (Hidalgo, Puebla, Querétaro, San Luis Potosí, Veracruz)
Additional data:
Lower elevation limit (metres):800
Upper elevation limit (metres):1850
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This species is known from six localities. Demographic studies at one of the localities in Coacoazintla (Veracruz state) indicate that the local population may exceed 500,000 individuals.
Current Population Trend:Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals:500000-750000
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Plants are widely distributed from low to moderate elevations and are found in areas ranging from evergreen tropical forests to cloud forests and mixed deciduous woodlands and a range of geological substrates. Typically found in rocky hills.
Systems:Terrestrial
Generation Length (years):45

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The mountain cloud forest habitat is threatened by habitat destruction. Forest is cleared for agriculture and cattle farming and is also impacted by the removal of wood for charcoal production. Strip mining to remove basaltic rock (e.g. in CoaCoatzincla) is also a threat, resulting in the removal of forest.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is listed on Appendix I of the CITES Appendices. Plants are conserved in the Sierra Gorda Biosphere Reserve in Queretaro state.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability:Suitable  
1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability:Suitable  
0. Root -> 6. Rocky areas (eg. inland cliffs, mountain peaks)
suitability:Marginal  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
  Subject to recent education and awareness programmes:Yes
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.2. Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

3. Energy production & mining -> 3.2. Mining & quarrying
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.3. Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest]
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology

♦  Unknown
 Local : ✓   National : ✓  International : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Chemnick, J., Gregory, T. and Morales, S. 2007. Email received in response to request for information.

Donaldson, J.S. 2006. Notes.

Donaldson, J.S. (ed.). 2003. Cycads. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan. IUCN/SSC Cycad Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK.

Hill, K.D. and Stevenson, D.W. 1998-2006. The Cycad Pages. Available at: http://plantnet.rbgsyd.gov.au/PlantNet/cycad/.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.3). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 2 September 2010).

Jones, D.L. 1993. Cycads of the World. Reed, New Holland, Frenchs Forest, N.S.W., Australia.

Whitelock, L.M. 2002. The Cycads. Timber Press, Portland, Oregon.


Citation: Vazquez, M., Bojorquez, H., Torres, L., Sanchez-Moreno, S., Sanchez-Morales, L. & Torres-Hernandez, L. 2010. Ceratozamia mexicana. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T42141A10665184. . Downloaded on 18 September 2018.
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