Callicebus medemi 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Primates Pitheciidae

Scientific Name: Callicebus medemi
Species Authority: Hershkovitz, 1963
Common Name(s):
English Colombian Black-handed Titi, Medem's Collared Titi, Colombian Black-handed Titi Monkey, Medem’s Titi Monkey
Callicebus torquatus subspecies medemi Hershkovitz, 1963
Taxonomic Notes: Kobayashi and Langguth (1999) and van Roosmalen et al. (2002) recognize five species groups – cupreus, donacophilus, moloch, personatus and torquatus. According to van Roosmalen et al. (2002), the C. torquatus group contains C. torquatus, C. lugens, C. lucifer, C. purinus, C. regulus and C. medemi.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable A2cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Veiga. L. M. & Palacios, E.
Reviewer(s): Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Listed as Vulnerable as there is reason to believe the species has declined by at least 30% over the past 25 years (three generations) due primarily to habitat loss in southern Colombia (mainly from increasing deforestation resulting from growing illicit crops).
Previously published Red List assessments:
2003 Least Concern (LC)
2000 Vulnerable (VU)
1996 Vulnerable (VU)
1996 Vulnerable (VU)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Occurs in the Colombian Amazon between the Ríos Caquetá and Putumayo in the Intendencia del Putumayo and the southern part of the Intendencia de Caquetá (Hershkovitz 1990). Martinez and Rowe (2003) confirmed that the species that occurs in Ecuador is C. lucifer not C. medemi as suggested by van Roosmalen et al. (2002).
Countries occurrence:
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There is no information available on the population status of this species.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented: No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: No data on the ecology of this species are available. Titi monkeys (Callicebus spp.) are known to occur in a wide range of habitats, although some species exhibit habitat preferences, for example C. lucifer is reported to prefer white-sand forests (E. Heymann pers. comm. 2008), and C. donacophilus drier forests (Ferrari et al. 2000; R. Wallace pers. comm.). Members of the C. moloch and C. cupreus groups are considered tolerant of habitat disturbance caused by human activity or seasonal flooding (van Roosmalen et al. 2002).

The diet of titis comprises mainly fruit pulp, leaves, insects and seeds. They form small, pair-bonded, territorial groups and are considered monogamous. They have small home (1.5-30 km) and day ranges (0.5-1.5 km).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The main threats to this species include habitat loss and degradation due to timber extraction, uncontrolled slash-and-burn agriculture and cattle grazing, and the planting of illegal crops and aerial spraying (even within the La Paya National Park; E. Palacios pers. comm.). There is also some hunting and trapping of animals for food and pets.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Occurs in La Paya National Park (Defler 2004), but due to the park's remote location, land tenure problems, and local political conflicts, it a difficult area to manage. It is listed on CITES Appendix II.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability: Suitable  
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
  Included in international legislation:Yes
  Subject to any international management/trade controls:Yes
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.3. Livestock farming & ranching -> 2.3.2. Small-holder grazing, ranching or farming
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.1. Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals -> 5.1.1. Intentional use (species is the target)
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.5. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.5. Threats

♦  Food - human
 Local : ✓   National : ✓ 

♦  Pets/display animals, horticulture
 Local : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Defler, T.R. 1994. La conservación de primates en Colombia. Trianea 5: 255-287.

Defler, T. R. 2004. Primates of Colombia. Conservation International, Washington, DC, Usa.

Eisenberg, J.F. 1989. Mammals of the Neotropics. The Northern Neotropics. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, USA and London, UK.

Ferrari S. F., Iwanaga S, Messias, M. R., Ramos E. M., Ramos, P. C. S., da Cruz Neto, E. H. and Coutinho, P. E. G. 2000. Titi monkeys (Callicebus spp., Atelidae: Platyrrhini) in Brazilian state of Rondonia.

Groves, C. P. 2001. Primate taxonomy. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, USA.

Hernández-Camacho, J. and Cooper, R. W. 1976. The nonhuman primates of Colombia. In: R. W. Thorington, Jr. and P. G. Heltne (eds), Neotropical Primates: Field Studies and Conservation, pp. 35-69. National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC, USA.

Hernández-Camacho, J. and Defler, T. R. 1989. Algunos aspectos de la conservación de primates no-humanos en Colombia. In: C. J. Saavedra, R. A. Mittermeier and I. B. Santos (eds), La Primatología en Latinoamerica, pp. 67-100. WWF-U.S., Washington, DC, USA.

Hershkovitz, P. 1988. Origin, speciation, and distribution of South American titi monkeys, genus Callicebus (Family Cebidae, Platyrrhini). Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia 140(1): 240-272.

Hershkovitz, P. 1990. Titis, New World monkeys of the genus Callicebus (Cebidae, Platyrrhini): a preliminary taxonomic review. Fieldiana: Zoology 55: 1-109.

Kobayashi, S. 1995. A phylogenetic study of titi monkeys, genus Callicebus, based on cranial measurements: I. Phyletic groups of Callicebus. Primates 36(1): 101-120.

Norconk, M. A. 2007. Saki, uakaris, and titi monkeys: behavioral diversity in a radiation of primate seed predators. In: C. J. Campbell, A. Fuentes, K. C.MacKinnon, M. Panger and S. K. Bearder (eds), Primates in Perspectives, pp. 123-138. Oxford University Press, New York, USA.

Van Roosmalen, M. G. M., Van Roosmalen, T. and Mittermeier, R.A. 2002. A taxonomic review of the titi monkeys, genus Callicebus Thomas, 1903, with the description of two new species, Callicebus bernhardi and Callicebus stephennashi, from Brazilian Amazonia. Neotropical Primates 10: 1-52.

Citation: Veiga. L. M. & Palacios, E. 2008. Callicebus medemi. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T39944A10294581. . Downloaded on 25 November 2015.
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