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Acomys subspinosus

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA RODENTIA MURIDAE

Scientific Name: Acomys subspinosus
Species Authority: (Waterhouse, 1838)
Common Name(s):
English Cape Spiny Mouse

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Schlitter, D. & Taylor, P.J.
Reviewer(s): Amori, G. (Small Nonvolant Mammal Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern because, it is widespread in the Western Cape of South Africa. It has an extent of occurrence >20,000 km², an area of occupancy >2,000 km², and the habitat is not severely fragmented. There are no major threats, although there may be some localised impacts due to alien invasives, and loss of habitat (in the lowlands) due to agriculture or expanding urbanization.
History:
2004 Least Concern
1996 Lower Risk/least concern (Baillie and Groombridge 1996)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is largely endemic to the Western Cape Province of South Africa; its range just extends into the Eastern and Northern Cape Provinces. The extent of occurrence is greater than 20,000 km². This species occurs up to about 1,000 m asl.
Countries:
Native:
South Africa (Eastern Cape Province, Northern Cape Province, Western Cape)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The current population numbers greater than 10,000 mature individuals.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is associated with rocky areas on mountain slopes in Fynbos vegetation. It is not known if the species can persist in disturbed or modified habitats.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): the Fynbos habitat is impacted in parts by alien invasives, but this is thought to be unlikely to impact this species. Animals in lower lying areas have been impacted by habitat loss due to crops and expanding urbanization. Overall the species is secure.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Research recommended into this species includes surveys, genetic research, and further research into the species' life history. It has been recorded from a number of protected areas.

Bibliography [top]

Bates, P. J. J. 1994. The distribution of Acomys (Rodentia: Muridae) in Africa and Asia. Israel Journal of Zoology 40: 199-214.

Musser, G. G. and Carleton, M. D. 2005. Superfamily Muroidea. In: D. E. Wilson and D. A. Reeder (eds), Mammal Species of the World: a geographic and taxonomic reference, pp. 894-1531. The John Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, USA.

Rathbun, G.B. (subeditor). 2005. Macroscelidea. In: Skinner, J. D. and Chimimba, C. T. (eds), The mammals of southern Africa subregion, 3rd edition, pp. 813 pp.. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.


Citation: Schlitter, D. & Taylor, P.J. 2008. Acomys subspinosus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 30 July 2014.
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