Accipiter haplochrous 


Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Aves Accipitriformes Accipitridae

Scientific Name: Accipiter haplochrous
Species Authority: Sclater, 1859
Common Name(s):
English White-bellied Goshawk
Taxonomic Source(s): del Hoyo, J., Collar, N.J., Christie, D.A., Elliott, A. and Fishpool, L.D.C. 2014. HBW and BirdLife International Illustrated Checklist of the Birds of the World. Lynx Edicions BirdLife International.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Near Threatened ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2012-05-01
Assessor(s): BirdLife International
Reviewer(s): Butchart, S. & Symes, A.
Contributor(s): Barré, N. & Chartendrault, V.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Derhé, M., Dutson, G., Mahood, S., O'Brien, A.
This species is classified as Near Threatened because it is confined to one small island on which habitat degradation may be causing a moderate decline.

Previously published Red List assessments:
2008 Near Threatened (NT)
2004 Near Threatened (NT)
2000 Lower Risk/near threatened (LR/nt)
1994 Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)
1988 Lower Risk/least concern (LR/lc)

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: Accipiter haplochrous is endemic to New Caledonia (to France) where it is fairly common throughout. It is distributed from the far north (Manjelia) to the far south at Goro. Its area of occurrence is therefore c.12,000 km2, which if each pair requires 3-5 km2, equates to a population of c.2,400-4,000 pairs (V. Chartendrault and N. Barré in litt. 2007).

Countries occurrence:
New Caledonia
Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO): Yes
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO): No
Estimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2: 16400
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO): Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO): No
Continuing decline in number of locations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in the number of locations: No
Upper elevation limit (metres): 1300
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: The global population numbers c.2,400-4,000 pairs (V. Chartendrault and N. Barré in litt. 2007), best placed precautionarily in band 2,500-9,999 individuals. This equates to 1,667-6,666 mature individuals, rounded here to 1,500-7,000 mature individuals.

Trend Justification:  There are no data on population trends; however, habitat degradation is suspected to be causing a slow to moderate decline.
Current Population Trend: Decreasing
Additional data:
Number of mature individuals: 1500-7000 Continuing decline of mature individuals: Yes
Extreme fluctuations: No Population severely fragmented: No
Continuing decline in subpopulations: Unknown
Extreme fluctuations in subpopulations: No All individuals in one subpopulation: No
No. of individuals in largest subpopulation: 100

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: It appears to be widespread in humid forest but occurs at lower densities in degraded forest and savannah where it coexists with Brown Goshawk A. fasciatus. It is not shy and often found close to human habitation (V. Chartendrault and N. Barré in litt. 2007).

Systems: Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat: Yes
Generation Length (years): 7.2
Movement patterns: Not a Migrant

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Despite legal protection, a few are killed around inhabitated areas, as it sometimes kills domestic chickens, and habitat loss and degradation are further threats (Vuilleumier and Gochfield 1976, Stokes 1980, Thiollay 1993, Ekstrom et al. 2000). However, it is assumed that it is not undergoing any significant continuing decline.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: Conservation Actions Underway
CITES Appendix II.

Conservation Actions Proposed
Ensure the protection of tracts of primary forest. Monitor populations in primary and degraded forest to ellucidate trends. Compare nesting success in primary and degraded forest. Run a public education campaign to discourage the killing of native raptors.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.6. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Lowland
suitability: Suitable season: resident major importance:Yes
1. Forest -> 1.9. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Moist Montane
suitability: Suitable season: resident major importance:No
2. Savanna -> 2.1. Savanna - Dry
suitability: Suitable season: resident major importance:No
3. Shrubland -> 3.8. Shrubland - Mediterranean-type Shrubby Vegetation
suitability: Suitable season: resident major importance:No
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.6. Artificial/Terrestrial - Subtropical/Tropical Heavily Degraded Former Forest
suitability: Suitable season: resident major importance:No
1. Land/water protection -> 1.2. Resource & habitat protection
3. Species management -> 3.2. Species recovery
4. Education & awareness -> 4.3. Awareness & communications

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
  Action Recovery plan:No
  Systematic monitoring scheme:No
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over entire range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
  Invasive species control or prevention:No
In-Place Species Management
  Successfully reintroduced or introduced beningly:No
  Subject to ex-situ conservation:No
In-Place Education
  Subject to recent education and awareness programmes:No
  Included in international legislation:No
  Subject to any international management/trade controls:Yes
2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.2. Small-holder farming
♦ timing: Ongoing ♦ scope: Minority (<50%) ♦ severity: Slow, Significant Declines  
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.1. Ecosystem conversion
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

5. Biological resource use -> 5.1. Hunting & trapping terrestrial animals -> 5.1.3. Persecution/control
♦ timing: Ongoing ♦ scope: Minority (<50%) ♦ severity: No decline  
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

5. Biological resource use -> 5.3. Logging & wood harvesting -> 5.3.3. Unintentional effects: (subsistence/small scale)
♦ timing: Ongoing ♦ scope: Minority (<50%) ♦ severity: No decline  
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats

♦  Pets/display animals, horticulture
 International : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Ekstrom, J. M. M.; Jones, J. P. G.; Willis, J.; Isherwood, I. 2000. The humid forests of New Caledonia: biological research and conservation recommendations for the vertebrate fauna of Grande Terre. CSB Conservation Publications, Cambridge, U.K.

IUCN. 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2012.1). Available at: (Accessed: 19 June 2012).

Stokes, T. 1980. Notes on the landbirds of New Caledonia. Emu 80: 81-86.

Thiollay, J.-M. 1993. Habitat segregation and the insular syndrome in two congeneric raptors in New Caledonia, the White-bellied Goshawk Accipiter haplochrous and the Brown Goshawk A. fasciatus. Ibis 135: 237-246.

Vuilleumier, F.; Gochfeld, M. 1976. Notes sur l'avifauna de Nouvelle-Calédonie. Alauda 44: 237-273.

Citation: BirdLife International. 2012. Accipiter haplochrous. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2012: e.T22695541A38265912. . Downloaded on 27 November 2015.
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