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Tadarida fulminans

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA CHIROPTERA MOLOSSIDAE

Scientific Name: Tadarida fulminans
Species Authority: (Thomas, 1903)
Common Name(s):
English Malagasy Free-tailed Bat, Lightning Guano Bat, Large Guano Bat, Madagascan Large Free-tailed Bat, Large Free-tailed Bat
Synonym(s):
Tadarida mastersoni Roberts, 1946

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Cotterill, F.P.D, Hutson, A.M., Racey, P.A. & Ravino, J.
Reviewer(s): Hutson, A.M., Racey, P.A. (Chiroptera Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)
Justification:
This species is listed as Least Concern in view of its wide range across east and southern Africa. Although it is not a common species and can be patchily distributed, it is not thought to be facing any major threats.
History:
2004 Least Concern

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species ranges through East Africa, southern Africa and a few localities on the island of Madagascar. Populations have been recorded through eastern and southeastern Africa, from around the border of Kenya and Uganda as far south as the border between Zimbabwe and South Africa. The most westerly record is from eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. In Madagascar it is only known from a few records, mostly from the central-south region near to Fianarantsoa and Isalo National Park, and from records at Tolagnaro near the southeast coast (Jenkins et al. 2007). Further surveys are needed within Madagascar (Goodman and Cardiff 2004). It ranges from about sea level (at Fort Dauphin in Madagascar) to close to 2,000 m asl (Albertine Rift).
Countries:
Native:
Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Kenya; Madagascar; Malawi; Rwanda; South Africa; Tanzania, United Republic of; Zambia; Zimbabwe
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Locally common, but patchily distributed in Africa. On Madagascar this bat is an uncommon, patchily distributed species. Colonies of this species may consist of dozens of individuals (although always fewer than 100 animals).
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species is found in both dry and moist savanna habitats (including 'savanna woodland'). It is not thought to be dependent on caves, but is found in rocky, granite outcrops.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There appear to be no major threats to this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It has been recorded from one protected area in Madagascar and is presumed to exist in many protected areas within its range in eastern and southern Africa, however, there appear to be no active conservation measures in place. Further studies are needed into the distribution and taxonomic status of bats allocated to Tadarida fulminans.

Bibliography [top]

Aggundey, I. R. and Schlitter, D. A. 1984. Annotated checklist of the mammals of Kenya. I. Chiroptera. Annals of Carnegie Museum 53: 119-161.

Cotterill, F. P. D. 1996. New distribution records of insectivorous bats of the families Nycteridae, Rhinolophidae and Vespertilionidae (Microchiroptera: Mammalia) in Zimbabwe. Arnoldia Zimbabwe 10(8): 71-89.

Goodman, S. M. and Cardiff, S. G. 2004. A new species of Chaerophon (Molossidae) from Madagascar with notes on other members of the family. Acta Chiropterologica 6: 227-248.

Jenkins, R. K. B., Kofoky, A. F, Russ, J. M.Friafidison, A., Siemers, B. M., Randrianandrianina, F. H., Mbohoahy, T., Rahaingodrahety, V. N and Racey, P. A. 2007. Ecology of Bats in the southern Anosy Region. In: J. U. Ganzhorn, S. M. Goodman, and M. Vincelette (eds), Biodiversity, ecology and conservation of littoral ecosystems in southeastern Madagascar, Tolagnaro (Fort Dauphin), Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA.

Rathbun, G.B. (subeditor). 2005. Macroscelidea. In: Skinner, J. D. and Chimimba, C. T. (eds), The mammals of southern Africa subregion, 3rd edition, pp. 813 pp.. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.

Schlitter, D. A., Aggundey, I. R., Qumsiyeh, M. B., Nelson, K. and Honeycutt, R. L. 1986. Taxonomic and distributional notes on bats from Kenya. Annals of Carnegie Museum 55(12): 297-302.

Simmons, N. B. 2005. Order Chiroptera. In: D. E. Wilson and D. M. Reeder (eds), Mammal Species of the World, pp. 312-529. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Taylor, P. J. 2000. Bats of Southern Africa: Guide to Biology, Identification, and Conservation. University of Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.


Citation: Cotterill, F.P.D, Hutson, A.M., Racey, P.A. & Ravino, J. 2008. Tadarida fulminans. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 30 September 2014.
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