Elops senegalensis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII ELOPIFORMES ELOPIDAE

Scientific Name: Elops senegalensis
Species Authority: Regan, 1909
Taxonomic Notes:

There are no issues regarding the validity of the species, but it should be noted that it is often confused with Elops lacerta. Elops senegalensis and E. lacerta occur sympatrically across the entire range of E. senegalensis, so further research appears warranted.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Data Deficient ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2011-03-30
Assessor(s): Adams, A., Guindon, K., Horodysky, A., MacDonald, T., McBride, R., Shenker, J. & Ward, R.
Reviewer(s): Harwell, H. & Raynal, M.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Harwell, H.
Justification:
Elops senegalensis is distributed in the eastern Atlantic from Mauritania to Democratic Republic of the Congo. Only a single specimen is reported from the Royal Ontario Musem, collected in Sierra Leone (accessed through the Fishnet2 Portal, www.fishnet2.net, 2011-05-14). In Benin, this species is listed as a commercially fished species. Little additional information exists regarding population status, ecology, life history, fisheries interactions or potential threats. Therefore, we consider this species Data Deficient.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:

Elops senegalensis is distributed in the eastern Atlantic from Mauritania to Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Countries:
Native:
Angola (Angola); Benin; Cameroon; Congo; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Côte d'Ivoire; Equatorial Guinea; Gabon; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Guinea-Bissau; Liberia; Mauritania; Morocco; Nigeria; Sao Tomé and Principe; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Togo; Western Sahara
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Atlantic – eastern central; Atlantic – southeast
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There is limited population information available for this species. Only a single specimen is reported from the Royal Ontario Musem, collected in Sierra Leone (accessed through the Fishnet2 Portal, www.fishnet2.net, 2011-05-14). In Benin, it is listed as a commercially fished species and reportedly comprised 0.06% of the relative abundance of the fish caught (Adite 2002). Abowei (2010) lists monthly CPUE data showing that they occur year-round. No time-series data are available, therefore the effects of the fishery on the stock are unknown.
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species occurs in estuaries of Nigeria and Benin (Adite 2002, Agboola and Anetekhai 2008, Abowei 2010). There is limited information on the specific habitat requirements and life history characteristics of this species. Elopidae are coastal dwelling species with spawning occurring at sea and larvae migrating inland into brackish waters. The maximum length recorded from Nigeria was 90 cm (TL) (Abowei 2010). Adite (2002) listed this species as a carnivore. It occurs year-round, as opposed to seasonally.
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Elops senegalensis is considered a highly commercial species in Benin (Adite 2002) and Nigeria (Abowei 2010). We infer small-scale subsistence fisheries across portions of its range.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The unknown extent of commercial fisheries and the magnitude of harvest suggest a potential threat to this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species, however its distribution overlaps with marine reserves in parts of its range. Furthermore, efforts are underway to improve the knowledge of the fishery in portions of the range (Abowei 2010).

Bibliography [top]

Abowei, J.F.N. 2010. The Condition Factor, Length-Weight Relationship and Abundance of Elops seneganensis (Regan, 1909) from Nkoro River, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Advance Journal of Food Science and Technology 2(1): 16-21.

Adite, A. 2002. The Mangrove Fishes in the Benin Estuarine System (Benin,West Africa) : Diversity, Degradation And Management Implications.

Agboola, J.I. and Anetekhai, M.A. 2008. Length-weight relationships of some fresh and brackish water fishes in Badagry creek, Nigeria. Journal of Applied Ichthyology 24: 623-625.

Fishnet2 Portal. 2011. Available at: http://www.fishnet2.net.

IUCN. 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2012.2). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 17 October 2012).


Citation: Adams, A., Guindon, K., Horodysky, A., MacDonald, T., McBride, R., Shenker, J. & Ward, R. 2012. Elops senegalensis. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 19 September 2014.
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