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Albula nemoptera

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA ACTINOPTERYGII ALBULIFORMES ALBULIDAE

Scientific Name: Albula nemoptera
Species Authority: (Fowler, 1911)
Common Name(s):
English Caribbean Bonefish, Threadfin Bonefish, Shafted Bonefish
Spanish Macabi, Inllaulá, Liguija, Macabí, Macabi de Hebra, Macabí de Hebra, Macabi Ratón, Ratón, Zorro de Hebra
French Banane Fil, Macabi
Synonym(s):
Dixonina nemoptera Fowler, 1911
Taxonomic Notes: The nomenclature of the bonefish family Albulidae is currently in a state of revision. Until recently, bonefish were considered to be comprised of two species, the circumglobal Albula vulpes and the western Atlantic and eastern Pacific Albula nemoptera; however, new molecular genetic information indicates that there are at least eight morphologically indistinguishable, but genetically distinct species (Colborn et al. 2001).

Albula nemoptera may eventually be split into Atlantic and Pacific species, pending the outcome of ongoing investigations (Bowen et al. 2008).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Data Deficient ver 3.1
Year Published: 2012
Date Assessed: 2011-03-29
Assessor(s): Adams, A., Guindon, K., Horodysky, A., MacDonald, T., McBride, R., Shenker, J. & Ward, R.
Reviewer(s): Harwell, H. & Raynal, M.
Facilitator/Compiler(s): Harwell, H.
Justification:
This species is known only from the tropical Pacific and the Atlantic coast of North and Central America (Wallace and Tringali 2010). Albula nemoptera may eventually be split into Atlantic and Pacific species, pending the outcome of ongoing investigations (Bowen et al. 2008). There is very little known about the life history, ecology, population status, or threats acting upon this species. Therefore, it is listed as Data Deficient.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species is known only from the tropical Pacific and the Atlantic coast Central America (Wallace and Tringali 2010).
Countries:
Native:
Colombia; Costa Rica; El Salvador; Guatemala; Honduras; Mexico; Nicaragua; Panama
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Atlantic – western central; Pacific – eastern central
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: Very little information is available on the population status of this species. There are numerous museum records, including specimens at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, the University of Florida, and the California Academy of Sciences in the United States (accessed through the Fishnet2 Portal, www.fishnet2.net, 2011-05-14).
Population Trend: Unknown

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This species occurs in deeper waters than the typical habitat of Albula species (Smith and Crabtree 2002). Anecdotal evidence and the capture location of some museum specimens indicate an association with river outflows (Bowen et al. 2008). It is mostly estuarine, especially found in estuaries of rivers along mountainous shores, on soft bottom habitats to depths of 50 m.

Diet studies indicate that 16 of 17 individuals collected over open sand bottom near the mouth of a river on the Pacific coast of Costa Rica had fish in their stomachs; one had crab remnants present (Adams unpublished data). The maximum size for this species is 51 cm (TL) (Robins and Ray 1986).

Additional information on the habitat and ecology of this species is absent.
Systems: Marine

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

The utilization of this species throughout its range is unknown.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

Threats to this species are unknown.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no species-specific conservation measures in place for this species. Its distribution overlaps with some marine protected areas in parts of its range.

Bibliography [top]

Bowen, B.W., Karl, S.A. and Pfeiler, E. 2008. Resolving evolutionary lineages and taxonomy of bonefishes (Albula spp.). In: J.S. Ault (ed.), Biology and Management of the World Tarpon and Bonefish Fisheries, pp. 147-154. CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group, Boca Raton, Florida.

Colborn, J., Crabtree, R.E., Shakee, J.B., Pfeiler, E. and Bowen, B.W. 2001. The evolutionary enigma of bonefishes (Albula spp.): crytic species and ancient separations in a globally-distributed shorefish. Evolution 55: 807-820.

Fishnet2 Portal. 2011. Available at: http://www.fishnet2.net.

IUCN. 2012. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2012.2). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 17 October 2012).

Robins, C.R. and Ray, G.C. 1986. A field guide to Atlantic coast fishes of North America. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, USA.

Smith, D.G. and Crabtree, R.E. 2002. Order Albuliformes. In: K. Carpenter (ed.), The Living Marine Resources of the Western Central Atlantic. FAO Species Identification Guide for Fishery Purposes, pp. 683-684. FAO, Rome.

Wallace, E.M. and Tringali, M.D. 2010. Identification of a novel member in the family Albulidae (bonefishes). Journal of Fish Biology 76: 1972-1983.


Citation: Adams, A., Guindon, K., Horodysky, A., MacDonald, T., McBride, R., Shenker, J. & Ward, R. 2012. Albula nemoptera. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.1. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 July 2014.
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