Halophila capricorni 

Scope: Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_onStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Translate page into:

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Plantae Tracheophyta Liliopsida Hydrocharitales Hydrocharitaceae

Scientific Name: Halophila capricorni
Species Authority: Larkum
Common Name(s):
English Species code: Hc
Taxonomic Notes: Halophila capricorni may be a variant of H. decipiens; taxonomic clarification is required.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2008-03-18
Assessor(s): Short, F.T., Coles, R., Waycott, M., Bujang, J.S., Fortes, M., Prathep, A., Kamal, A.H.M., Jagtap, T.G., Bandeira, S., Freeman, A., Erftemeijer, P., La Nafie, Y.A., Vergara, S., Calumpong, H.P. & Makm, I.
Reviewer(s): Livingstone, S., Harwell, H. & Carpenter, K.E.
Justification:
Halophila capricorni is a poorly known seagrass species and records are patchy and rare. The species lives in deeper waters and may be more widely distributed than currently reported. The overall population trend is unknown. More research is needed on taxonomy, distribution, general biology and threats. This is a fast recolonizing species and it lives in deeper waters. Halophila capricorni is listed as Least Concern.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Halophila capricorni is found in the Pacific Ocean on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia, north through the Torres Straits, and across the Coral Sea to New Caledonia.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Australia; New Caledonia
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Native:
Pacific – western central
Additional data:
Lower depth limit (metres):54
Upper depth limit (metres):21
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:Records for Halophila capricorni are patchy and rare. Overall population trends are unknown.

This species has been collected commonly in the Great Barrier Reef in recent surveys in deeper water (Coles et al. 2000).
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Halophila capricorni lives in deeper waters from 21-54 m in sandy and muddy substrates. It readily sets seed. Halophila capricorni has leaves that are similar to H. decipiens, except that hairs are only on one side of the leaf. Flowering also differs; in H. capricorni it is truly monoecious (male and female flowers on separate nodes on the same plant).
Systems:Marine

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): Major threats to Halophila capricorni are unknown. Localized threats may be caused by increased sediment loads in water. Trawling activities may also create localized threats.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: There are no specific conservation measures for Halophila capricorni. It may be present in some parts of the Great Barrier Reef  Marine Park. More research is needed on taxonomy, distribution, general biology and threats of this species.

Classifications [top]

9. Marine Neritic -> 9.4. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Sandy
suitability:Suitable  
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.5. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Sandy-Mud
suitability:Suitable  
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.6. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Muddy
suitability:Suitable  
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.9. Marine Neritic - Seagrass (Submerged)
suitability:Suitable  

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.2. Commercial & industrial areas
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

4. Transportation & service corridors -> 4.3. Shipping lanes
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

5. Biological resource use -> 5.4. Fishing & harvesting aquatic resources -> 5.4.6. Motivation Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.2. Soil erosion, sedimentation
♦ timing:Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.1. Taxonomy
1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends

Bibliography [top]

Coles, R.G., Lee Long, W.J., McKenzie, L.J., Roelofs, A.J. and De’ath, G. 2000. Stratification of seagrasses in the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area, Northeastern Australia, and the implications for management. Biologia Marina Mediterranea 7(2): 345-348.

Green, E.P. and Short, F.T. 2003. World Atlas of Seagrasses. University of California Press, Berkeley.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.3). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 2 September 2010).


Citation: Short, F.T., Coles, R., Waycott, M., Bujang, J.S., Fortes, M., Prathep, A., Kamal, A.H.M., Jagtap, T.G., Bandeira, S., Freeman, A., Erftemeijer, P., La Nafie, Y.A., Vergara, S., Calumpong, H.P. & Makm, I. 2010. Halophila capricorni. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T173365A7000432. . Downloaded on 06 December 2016.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided