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Osteochilus longidorsalis 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Actinopterygii Cypriniformes Cyprinidae

Scientific Name: Osteochilus longidorsalis (Pethiyagoda & Kottelat, 1994)
Common Name(s):
English Long Finned Barb, Hiffin Carp
Synonym(s):
Osteochilichthys longidorsalis Pethiyagoda & Kottelat, 1994
Taxonomic Notes: Osteochilus longidorsalis was first described from Vettilapara in Chalakudy River, Kerala, India (Pethiyagoda and Kottelat 1994).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2011
Date Assessed: 2010-04-04
Assessor(s): Raghavan, R. & Ali, A.
Reviewer(s): Rema Devi, K.R., Gopalakrishnan, A., Arunachalam, M., Shrikant, J., Johnson, J.A., Rahul, K. & Molur, S.
Contributor(s): Molur, S.
Justification:
Osteochilus longidorsalis is listed as Endangered as it is only known from the Chalakudy and Periyar River basins in Kerala where the area of occupancy is restricted to less than 60 km2 and extent is less than 3,000 km2. The two locations are threatened by the presence of exotic species, continuing decline in the quality of habitat, destructive fishing, tourism and a proposed hydroelectric power project.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:Osteochilus longidorsalis is endemic to the Western Ghats in the state of Kerala, India (Ponniah and Gopalakrishnan 2000, Dahanukar et al. 2004). Known from the Chalakudy (including Parambikulam Tiger Reserve) and Periyar Rivers (Ajithkumar et al. 1999, Biju et al. 1999, Devi et al. 2005, Euphrasia et al. 2006, Kurup et al. 2004, Pethiyagoda and Kottelat 1994, Raghavan et al. 2008a).
Countries occurrence:
Native:
India (Kerala)
Additional data:
Estimated area of occupancy (AOO) - km2:55Continuing decline in area of occupancy (AOO):No
Extreme fluctuations in area of occupancy (AOO):NoEstimated extent of occurrence (EOO) - km2:2573
Continuing decline in extent of occurrence (EOO):NoExtreme fluctuations in extent of occurrence (EOO):No
Number of Locations:2Continuing decline in number of locations:No
Lower elevation limit (metres):50
Upper elevation limit (metres):660
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:No information on the population is available. Osteochilus longidorsalis is known to be rare (Ajithkumar et al. 1999) or very rare (Thomas et al. 2002) in Chalakudy River. Catch per hour at various sites in Chalakudy River is very low (Euphrasia et al. 2006).
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:Inhabits torrential streams with clear water and moderate canopy cover (Shaji and Easa 2003) with boulders, cobbles and bed rock as the major substrates (A. Ali and R. Raghavan per. obs.). Known to be a habitat specialist with affinity towards pool, riffles and cascades (Manojkumar and Kurup 2002). It is a herbivorous feeder subsisting on plants, seeds and algae (Thomas 2004).
Systems:Freshwater
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Yes

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade: Ostepchilus longidorsalis is exploited as a food fish from Chalakudy River by tribals and other local communities (R.Raghavan and A. Ali pers. obs.). Juveniles are exported to the international aquarium pet trade (Raghavan 2010).

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

In Chalakudy River, O. longidorsalis is threatened by the presence of exotic species, destructive fishing methods, increasing tourism and pollution (Raghavan et al. 2008a, b). There is also a threat from a proposed hydroelectric power project. In Periyar River, the species is under threat from destructive fishing practices including dynamiting and poisoning (A. Ali and R.Raghavan pers. obs.).

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: No conservation actions are in place. There is an urgent need to carry out research to generate baseline data on population, life history traits, ecology and exploitation. Captive breeding and milt cryopreservation techniques have developed at NBFGR (A. Gopalakrishnan pers. comm.).

Classifications [top]

5. Wetlands (inland) -> 5.1. Wetlands (inland) - Permanent Rivers/Streams/Creeks (includes waterfalls)
suitability:Suitable  major importance:Yes
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection
1. Land/water protection -> 1.2. Resource & habitat protection
2. Land/water management -> 2.2. Invasive/problematic species control
3. Species management -> 3.4. Ex-situ conservation -> 3.4.2. Genome resource bank
4. Education & awareness -> 4.3. Awareness & communications

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
  Action Recovery plan:No
  Systematic monitoring scheme:No
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Conservation sites identified:Yes, over part of range
  Occur in at least one PA:Yes
  Area based regional management plan:No
  Invasive species control or prevention:No
In-Place Species Management
  Harvest management plan:No
  Successfully reintroduced or introduced beningly:No
  Subject to ex-situ conservation:No
In-Place Education
  Subject to recent education and awareness programmes:No
  Included in international legislation:No
  Subject to any international management/trade controls:No
1. Residential & commercial development -> 1.3. Tourism & recreation areas
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Majority (50-90%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.3. Indirect species effects -> 2.3.8. Other

2. Agriculture & aquaculture -> 2.1. Annual & perennial non-timber crops -> 2.1.3. Agro-industry farming
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Majority (50-90%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

5. Biological resource use -> 5.4. Fishing & harvesting aquatic resources -> 5.4.1. Intentional use: (subsistence/small scale) [harvest]
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Whole (>90%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

6. Human intrusions & disturbance -> 6.1. Recreational activities
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Majority (50-90%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.2. Species disturbance

8. Invasive and other problematic species, genes & diseases -> 8.1. Invasive non-native/alien species/diseases -> 8.1.1. Unspecified species
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Majority (50-90%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.3. Indirect species effects -> 2.3.2. Competition
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.3. Indirect species effects -> 2.3.8. Other

9. Pollution -> 9.1. Domestic & urban waste water -> 9.1.1. Sewage
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Minority (<50%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

9. Pollution -> 9.3. Agricultural & forestry effluents -> 9.3.2. Soil erosion, sedimentation
♦ timing:Ongoing ♦ scope:Minority (<50%) ♦ severity:Unknown ⇒ Impact score:Unknown 
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology
1. Research -> 1.5. Threats
2. Conservation Planning -> 2.1. Species Action/Recovery Plan
2. Conservation Planning -> 2.3. Harvest & Trade Management Plan
3. Monitoring -> 3.1. Population trends
3. Monitoring -> 3.2. Harvest level trends
3. Monitoring -> 3.3. Trade trends

♦  Food - human
 Local : ✓ 

♦  Pets/display animals, horticulture
 International : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Ajithkumar, C.R., Devi, K.R., Thomas, K.R and Biju, C.R. 1999. Fish fauna, abundance and distribution in Chalakudy River system, Kerala. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 96(2): 244-254.

Biju, C.R., Thomas, K.R. and Ajithkumar, C.R. 2000. Index areas selected for long time monitoring and conservation. In: B.F. Chhapgar and R. Manakadan (eds), Ecology of hill streams of Western Ghats with special reference to community. Bombay Natural History Society, Mumbai.

Biju, C.R., Thomas, R.K. and Ajithkumar, C.R. 1999. Fishes of Parambikulam Wildlife Sanctuary, Palakkad District, Kerala. 96 1(82-87).

Chattopadhyay, S., Rani, L.A. and Sangeetha, P.V. 2005. Water quality variations as linked to land use pattern: a case study in Chalakudy River Basin Kerala. Current Science 89(12): 2163-2169.

Dahanukar, N., Raut, R. and Bhat, A. 2004. Distribution, endemism and threat status of freshwater fishes in the Western Ghats of India. Journal of Biogeography 31: 123-136.

Devi, K.R., Indra, T.J., Raghunathan, M.B. and Ravichandran, M.S. 2005. Fish fauna of the Anamalai Hill Ranges, Western Ghats, India. Zoos Print Journal 20(3): 1809-1811.

Euphrasia, C.J., Radhakrishnan, K.V. and Kurup, B.M. 2006. The threatened freshwater fishes of Kerala, India. In: B.M. Kurup. and K. Ravindran (eds), Sustain Fish 2005. International Symposium on improved Sustainability of Fish Production Systems and appropriate technologies for utilization, pp. 570-588. Kochi, India.

IUCN. 2011. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2011.1). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 30 June 2017).

Kurup, B.M., Radhakrishnan, K.V. and Manojkumar, T.G. 2004. Biodiversity Status of Fishes Inhabiting Rivers of Kerala (South India) With Special Reference to Endemism, Threats and Conservation Measures. In: R.L. Welcomme and T. Petr (eds), Proceedings of the second international symposium on the management of large rivers for fisheries 2: 316. Cambodia.

Manojkumar, T.G. and Kurup, B.M. 2002. Fish habitat diversity and species assemblage structure with reference to five major river systems of Kerala. In: M.R. Boopendranath et al. (ed.), Riverine and Reservoir Fisheries in India, pp. 141-150. Kochi.

Pethiyagoda, R and Kottelat, M. 1994. Three new species of fishes of the genera Osteochilichthys (Cyprinidae), Travancoria (Balitoridae), and Horabagrus (Bagridae) from the Chalakudy river, Kerala, India. Journal of the South Asian Natural History 1(1): 97-116.

Raghavan, R. 2010. Ornamental fisheries and trade in Kerala. In: Sonnenschein, L. and Benziger, A. (eds), Conservation of Fishes in Kerala, India, pp. 169-187. World Aquarium, St. Louis.

Raghavan, R., Prasad, G., Ali, A.P.H. and Pereira, B. 2008a. Fish fauna of Chalakudy River, part of Western Ghat Biodiversity Hotspot, Kerala, India: patterns of distribution, threats and conservation needs. Biodiversity and Conservation 17(13): 3119-3131.

Raghavan, R., Prasad, G., Ali, A.P.H and Pereira, B. 2008b. Exotic fish species in a global biodiversity hotspot: observations from River Chalakudy, part of Western Ghats, Kerala, India. Biological Invasions 10(1): 37-40.

Shaji, C.P. and Easa, P.S. (eds). 2003. Freshwater fishes of Kerala. pp. 125. Kerala Forest Research Research Institute (KFRI), Thrissur.

Thomas, R.K., George, M.J and Biju, C.R. 2002. Freshwater fishes of Southern Kerala with notes on the distribution of endemic and endangered species. Journal of the Bombay Natural History Society 99(1): 47-53.


Citation: Raghavan, R. & Ali, A. 2011. Osteochilus longidorsalis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2011: e.T172422A6888995. . Downloaded on 20 September 2018.
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