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Calopteryx aequabilis

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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA ARTHROPODA INSECTA ODONATA CALOPTERYGIDAE

Scientific Name: Calopteryx aequabilis
Species Authority: Say, 1840
Common Name(s):
English River Jewelwing
French Caloptéryx à Taches Apicales
Taxonomic Notes: Several described subspecies, none of them very well defined.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2009
Date Assessed: 2007-03-01
Assessor(s): Paulson, D. R.
Reviewer(s): Clausnitzer, V. & Kalkman, V. (Odonata Red List Authority)
Justification:
C. aequabilis is common all across North America, in many protected areas and there is no indication of any population decline.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description: This species occurs in eight provinces and one territory in Canada and twenty eight states in the United States of America.
Countries:
Native:
Canada (Alberta, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland I, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Prince Edward I., Québec, Saskatchewan); United States (California, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin, Wyoming)
Range Map: Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: C. aequabilis is an abundant and widespread species.
Population Trend: Stable

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Found at clear streams of all sizes and rivers with moderate current. Can be common in places on rather tiny wooded streams, as long as there is some sun penetration. Also seen at rocky shores of large lakes in some areas.
Systems: Terrestrial; Freshwater

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no threats presently affecting this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: The species is present in many federal, state, local, and private reserves and appears no to require any further conservation actions at this time.

Bibliography [top]

IUCN. 2009. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2009.2). Available at: www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 3 November 2009).

Manolis, T. 2003. Dragonflies and damselflies of California. University of California Press.

Nikula, B., Loose, J.L. and Burne, M.R. 2003. A Field Guide to the Dragonflies and Damselflies of Massachusetts. Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife.

Paulson, D.R. in press. Dragonflies of Western North America: The Photo Guide. Princeton University Press, Princeton.

Walker, E.M. 1958. The Odonata of Canada and Alaska. Vol. II, Part III, The Anisoptera of Canada and Alaska. University of Toronto Press.

Westfall, M.J., Jr., and May, M.L. 1996. Damselflies of North America. Scientific Publishers, Gainesville, Florida.


Citation: Paulson, D. R. 2009. Calopteryx aequabilis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 22 August 2014.
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