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Mops condylurus 

Scope: Global
Language: English
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Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Mammalia Chiroptera Molossidae

Scientific Name: Mops condylurus
Species Authority: (A. Smith, 1833)
Common Name(s):
English Angolan Mops Bat, Angolan Free-tailed Bat, Knob-tailed Mops Bat, Knob-tailed Nyctinome
French Molosse d'Angola, Tadaride d'Angola
Synonym(s):
Mops angolensis Peters, 1870
Mops fulva Thomas, 1908
Mops occidentalis Monard, 1939
Mops orientis G.M. Allen & Loveridge, 1942
Mops osborni J.A. Allen, 1917
Mops wonderi Sanbron, 1936
Nyctinomus condylurus A. Smith, 1833
Tadarida condylura (A. Smith, 1833)
Taxonomic Source(s): ACR. 2014. African Chiroptera Report 2014. African Bats, Pretoria. Available from http://www.africanbats.org.

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Mickleburgh, S., Hutson, A.M., Bergmans, W. & Cotterill, F.P.D.
Reviewer(s): Hutson, A.M., Racey, P.A. (Chiroptera Red List Authority) & Cox, N. (Global Mammal Assessment Team)
Justification:
Listed as Least Concern in view of its wide distribution, presumed large population, and because it is unlikely to be declining fast enough to qualify for listing in a more threatened category.
Previously published Red List assessments:

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This bat is widely distributed over much of sub-Saharan Africa. It ranges from Senegal, the Gambia and Mali in the west, to the Sudan, Ethiopia and Somalia in the east; from here it ranges southwards through much of eastern and southern Africa, as far south as eastern South Africa and Swaziland. The species appears to be largely absent from the Congo Basin.
Countries occurrence:
Native:
Angola (Angola); Benin; Botswana; Burkina Faso; Burundi; Congo, The Democratic Republic of the; Côte d'Ivoire; Ethiopia; Gambia; Ghana; Guinea; Kenya; Malawi; Mali; Mozambique; Namibia; Niger; Nigeria; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; South Africa; South Sudan; Sudan; Swaziland; Tanzania, United Republic of; Togo; Uganda; Zambia; Zimbabwe
Additional data:
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This is a common species.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species is largely associated with savanna habitats (both moist and dry), although it may sometimes be encountered at the edges of woodland. It is commonly found roosting in buildings, hollow trees and rock crevices.
Systems:Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): There are no major threats to this species. Some colonies roosting within buildings are possibly threatened by general persecution.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is present in a number of protected areas. No direct conservation actions are currently needed for the species as a whole.

Classifications [top]

14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.5. Artificial/Terrestrial - Urban Areas
suitability:Unknown  
14. Artificial/Terrestrial -> 14.4. Artificial/Terrestrial - Rural Gardens
suitability:Marginal  
2. Savanna -> 2.2. Savanna - Moist
suitability:Suitable  
2. Savanna -> 2.1. Savanna - Dry
suitability:Suitable  
1. Land/water protection -> 1.1. Site/area protection

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends

Bibliography [top]

Aggundey, I.R. and Schlitter, D.A. 1984. Annotated checklist of the mammals of Kenya. I. Chiroptera. Annals of Carnegie Museum 53: 119-161.

Freeman, P.W. 1981. A Multivariate Study of the Family Molossidae (Mammalia, Chiroptera): Morphology, Ecology, Evolution. Fieldiana: Zoology 7: 1-173.

Grubb, P., Jones, T.S., Davies, A.G., Edberg, E., Starin, E.D. and Hill, J.E. 1998. Mammals of Ghana, Sierra Leone and The Gambia. Trendrine Press, Zennor, St Ives, Cornwall, UK.

Happold, D.C.D. 1987. The Mammals of Nigeria. Oxford University Press, London, UK.

Hill, J.E. and Carter, T.D. 1941. The mammals of Angola, Africa. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 78: 1.

IUCN. 2008. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 5 October 2008).

Koopman, K.F. 1975. Bats of the Sudan. Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History 154(4): 355-444.

Koopman, K. F. 1989. Systematic notes on Liberian bats. American Museum Novitates 2946: 1-11.

Koopman, K. F., Kofrin, C. P. and Chapman, A. 1995. The bats of Liberia: Systematics, ecology and distribution. American Museum Novitates 3148: 1-24.

Peterson, R. L.; Eger, J. L. and Mitchell, L. 1995. Faune de Madagascar. Chiropteres. Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, Paris, France.

Rathbun, G.B. (subeditor). 2005. Macroscelidea. In: J.D. Skinner and C.T. Chimimba (eds), The Mammals of the Southern African Subregion, 3rd edition, pp. 22-34. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK.

Simmons, N.B. 2005. Order Chiroptera. In: D.E. Wilson and D.M. Reeder (eds), Mammal Species of the World, pp. 312-529. The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Taylor, P. 1998. The Smaller Mammals of KwaZulu-Natal. University of Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.

Taylor, P. J. 2000. Bats of South Africa. University of Natal Press, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa.


Citation: Mickleburgh, S., Hutson, A.M., Bergmans, W. & Cotterill, F.P.D. 2008. Mops condylurus. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2008: e.T13838A4355738. . Downloaded on 29 June 2017.
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