Cacajao ayresi

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_onStatus_en_offStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA PRIMATES PITHECIIDAE

Scientific Name: Cacajao ayresi
Species Authority: Boubli, da Silva, Amado, Herbk, Pontual & Farias, 2008
Common Name(s):
English Ayres Black Uakari
Taxonomic Notes: The taxonomy of this newly described species follows Boubli et al. (2008).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Vulnerable B1ab(v) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2008
Date Assessed: 2008-06-30
Assessor(s): Boubli, J.-P. & Veiga, L.M.
Reviewer(s): Mittermeier, R.A. & Rylands, A.B. (Primate Red List Authority)
Justification:
Listed as Vulnerable as the range of this species is around 5,000-6,000 km², and there is a continuing decline in the numbers of mature individuals due to hunting. Although the habitat is not severely fragmented, the area is defined as a single location given that hunting is taking place throughout the small range.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:The range of Ayres Black Uakari is limited to a small area comprising the Curuduri River Basin and the mid to lower Aracá River. Local people claim this species is present in neighbouring areas, but field surveys to date have failed to confirm the existence of this monkey outside the region of the Curuduri, Aracá Rivers. The total geographic range of C. ayresi might be as small as 5,000-6,000 km².
Countries:
Native:
Brazil
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: There are no data concerning the population status of this species.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: Very little is known about the ecology of the Ayres Black Uakari. It has only been seen twice in the wild in igapós in large groves of the palm Mauritia flexuosa and terra firme forest interspersed by an open herbaceous vegetation characteristic of the Aracá River basin (J-P. Boubli, pers. obs.).
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): This species has a very limited distribution. Human settlements are few and small in the extent of occurrence. Hunting appears to be restricted to the rainy season when fish, the main source of protein for people in the Aracá River, become scarce. During the rainy season, all black uakaris use igapó forests intensively to take advantage of the pulse of fruit production at this time. While foraging in the igapó, black uakaris are easy to find because of the noise produced when fruits are dropped into the water.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: It is listed on Appendix I of CITES. This is the only black uakari not in any protected area. A conservation strategy for the species should be based on a conceptual mosaic composed of fully protected areas, a private reserve and community-based extractive areas. The success of a conservation programme for the black uacari in the Aracá River depends on the participation of traditional local communities (the ‘piassabeiros’ and other important stakeholders exploit the fiber of Leopoldina piassaba) in the process of reserve creation and management.

Bibliography [top]

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Citation: Boubli, J.-P. & Veiga, L.M. 2008. Cacajao ayresi. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 01 August 2014.
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