Acropogon calcicola 

Scope:Global
Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_onStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Plantae Tracheophyta Magnoliopsida Malvales Sterculiaceae

Scientific Name: Acropogon calcicola
Species Authority: Morat & Chalopin

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered B1ab(iii)+2ab(iii) ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2007-05-15
Assessor(s): Hequet, V.
Reviewer(s): Pollock, C.M. & Hilton-Taylor, C.
Justification:
Acropogon calcicolus is endemic to a single valley in Gohapin (Poya, New Caledonia) where it grows exclusively on calcareous cliffs. Two subpopulations are known but there may be others. It has an extent of occurrence (EOO) and an area of occupancy (AOO) of 8 km². Dry forests are extremely threatened in New Caledonia. The reduction of this habitat has been estimated at 95% over the last 150 years (Bouchet 1995) and this degradation continues today. However, dry forests in Gohapin are a little more protected because they are inaccessible, and also because they are culturally taboo for local tribes thus access is strictly limited for most of them. However the dry forests here are not free from fires. Uncontrolled fires sweep across lowland New Caledonia each year during the dry season and are slowly transforming remnant patches of dry forest into shrubland dominated by Acacia spirorbis and Leucaena leucocephala or Niaouli (Melaleuca quinquenervia) savannas.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to New Caledonia. It is known from a single valley in Gohapin (Poya) where it grows exclusively on calcareous cliffs. Its total extent of occurrence and area of occupancy are 8 km².
Countries occurrence:
Native:
New Caledonia
Additional data:
Estimated area of occupancy (AOO) - km2:8
Number of Locations:2
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population:This is an extremely localized species that grows exclusively on inaccessible cliffs. Two locations are known but there may be more on unsurveyed cliffs. When present, the species can form dense subpopulations but always over very small areas.
Current Population Trend:Unknown
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:This species is endemic to calcareous dry forest of Gohapin valley. The dry forest of Gohapin valley represents a very uncommon habitat; it is an inland dry forest (while most dry forests are coastal) scattered with steep calcareous cliffs. Dry forests in general are extremely impacted by human activities, especially agriculture and fires. The cliffs of Gohapin are a little more preserved first because they are inaccessible but also because they are culturally taboo for local tribes thus access is strictly limited for most of them. However they are not free from fires.
Systems:Terrestrial
Continuing decline in area, extent and/or quality of habitat:Yes

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): The major threat is uncontrolled fire that sweeps across lowland New Caledonia each year during the dry season.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: The cliffs at Gohapin are not easily accessible; it is culturally taboo for local tribes to go there and access is strictly limited for most of them. There is no other protection for this habitat.

Classifications [top]

1. Forest -> 1.5. Forest - Subtropical/Tropical Dry
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
2. Land/water management -> 2.1. Site/area management

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
7. Natural system modifications -> 7.1. Fire & fire suppression -> 7.1.3. Trend Unknown/Unrecorded
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

8. Invasive & other problematic species & genes -> 8.1. Invasive non-native/alien species -> 8.1.1. Unspecified species
♦ timing: Ongoing    
→ Stresses
  • 1. Ecosystem stresses -> 1.2. Ecosystem degradation

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends
1. Research -> 1.3. Life history & ecology

Bibliography [top]

Bouchet, P., Jaffré, T. and Veillon, J.-M. 1995. Plant extinction in New Caledonia: protection of sclerophyll forest urgently needed. Biodiversity and Conservation 4: 415-428.

de Garine-Wichatitsky, M., Soubeyran, Y., Maillard, D. and Duncan, P. 2005. The diets of introduced rusa deer (Cervus timorensis russa) in a native sclerophyll forest and a native rainforest of New Caledonia. New Zealand Journal of Zoology 32(2): 117-126.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.4). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 27 October 2010).

Jaffré, T., Bouchet, P. and Veillon, J.-M. 1998. Threatened plants of New Caledonia: Is the system of protected areas adequate? Biodiversity and Conservation 7: 109-135.

Jaffré, T., Morat, P. and Veillon, J.-M. 1993. Etude floristique et phytogéographique de la forêt sclérophylle de Nouvelle-Calédonie. Bulletin du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle. Section B, Adansonia 15(1-4): 107-146.

Meyer, J.-Y. 2000. Preliminary review of the invasive plants in the Pacific islands (SPREP Member Countries). Invasive species in the Pacific: A technical review and draft regional strategy. In: G. Sherley (ed.). SPREP.

Morat, P. and Chalopin, M. 2007. Contribution à l'étude des Malvaceae, Sterculieae de la Nouvelle-Calédonie : nouvelles espèces dans le genre Acropogon Schltr. Adansonia, sér. 3 29(1): 93-104.


Citation: Hequet, V. 2010. Acropogon calcicola. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T177839A7467365. . Downloaded on 29 July 2016.
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