Dendrolagus mbaiso

Status_ne_offStatus_dd_offStatus_lc_offStatus_nt_offStatus_vu_offStatus_en_onStatus_cr_offStatus_ew_offStatus_ex_off

Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
ANIMALIA CHORDATA MAMMALIA DIPROTODONTIA MACROPODIDAE

Scientific Name: Dendrolagus mbaiso
Species Authority: Flannery, Boeadi & Szalay, 1995
Common Name(s):
English Dingiso

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Endangered A2cd ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-09-13
Assessor(s): Leary, T., Seri, L., Wright, D., Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., Singadan, R., Menzies, J., Allison, A., James, R., Dickman, C., Aplin, K., Flannery, T., Martin, R. & Salas, L.
Reviewer(s): Lamoreux, J. & Hilton-Taylor, C.
Justification:
Listed as Endangered because of an ongoing, drastic population decline, suspected to be more than 50% over the last three generations (i.e., 30 years), due to increasing human activities (agriculture and hunting). The western-most parts of the population are currently secure because of traditional beliefs, but if those change, the species could very quickly slip towards extinction. Climate change also poses a long-term threat for this sub-alpine species; already the climate changes are allowing different agricultural practices.
History:
1996 Vulnerable

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This species is endemic to the island of New Guinea, where it is restricted to the Tembagapura and Kwiyawagi mountains of Papua Province, Indonesia. It is found between 2,700 and 3,500 m asl.
Countries:
Native:
Indonesia
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]

Population: It is a very rare species.
Population Trend: Decreasing

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology: This is a sub-alpine species. It is present in upper montane low mossy forest or scrub type habitats, usually above 2,700 m. It is largely a terrestrial species that is found in rugged areas. These are very docile animals.
Systems: Terrestrial

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s): It is threatened by hunting for food in parts of its range. In the western parts of the range the species is still protected by tradition, but in the eastern parts it has undergone major declines due to increasing human population and loss of habitat. Climate change also poses a long-term threat for this sub-alpine species; already the climate changes are allowing changes in agricultural practices.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions: This species is not present in any protected areas. It is protected from hunting in parts of its range by traditional beliefs. Further studies are needed into the distribution, abundance, natural history, and threats to this species.

Bibliography [top]

Flannery, T. F. 1995. The Mammals of New Guinea, 2nd edition. Reed Books, Sydney, Australia.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.2). Available at: http://www.iucnredlist.org. (Accessed: 29 June 2010).


Citation: Leary, T., Seri, L., Wright, D., Hamilton, S., Helgen, K., Singadan, R., Menzies, J., Allison, A., James, R., Dickman, C., Aplin, K., Flannery, T., Martin, R. & Salas, L. 2010. Dendrolagus mbaiso. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.3. <www.iucnredlist.org>. Downloaded on 23 November 2014.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided