Taxonomy [top]

Kingdom Phylum Class Order Family
Animalia Chordata Actinopterygii Perciformes Pomacanthidae

Scientific Name: Centropyge boylei
Species Authority: Pyle & Randall, 1992
Common Name(s):
English Peppermint Angelfish
Taxonomic Notes: This species is often included within the genus Paracentropyge (R. Pyle pers. comm. 2009).

Assessment Information [top]

Red List Category & Criteria: Least Concern ver 3.1
Year Published: 2010
Date Assessed: 2009-10-09
Assessor(s): Pyle, R., Myers, R. & Craig, M.T.
Reviewer(s): Elfes, C., Polidoro, B., Livingstone, S. & Carpenter, K.E.

Listed as Least Concern, as despite its relatively limited known distribution, this species occurs in large populations, there is very limited collection of specimens for the aquarium fish trade, no substantial habitat loss, and there are no apparent threats overall.

Geographic Range [top]

Range Description:This little-known species is known only from Rarotonga Island of the Cook Islands in the South Pacfic, although it likely occurs in other areas in the southeastern tropical Pacific. It has been recorded at depths of 55-120 m (Pyle 2001, G.R. Allen pers. comm. 2006).
Countries occurrence:
Cook Islands
FAO Marine Fishing Areas:
Pacific – eastern central
Lower depth limit (metres):120
Upper depth limit (metres):55
Range Map:Click here to open the map viewer and explore range.

Population [top]


Little is known about the global abundance or population status of this species, although it is locally abundant at Rarotonga, and generally presumed to be stable (R. Pyle pers. comm. 2009).

Current Population Trend:Stable
Additional data:
Population severely fragmented:No

Habitat and Ecology [top]

Habitat and Ecology:It has been recorded from coral rubble areas, ledges and caves on steep outer reef slopes (Pyle 2001, G.R. Allen pers. comm.). Natural diet is unknown; it forms pairs or small groups (Pyle 2001).

Use and Trade [top]

Use and Trade:

It is rarely collected for the aquarium trade, and commands a very high price when available because of the difficulties in collecting this species from its relatively remote distribution and deepwater habitat.

Threats [top]

Major Threat(s):

While it possibly has a limited distribution, there is no substantial habitat loss, it is rarely collected for the marine aquarium fish trade, and there appear to be no major threats to this species.

Conservation Actions [top]

Conservation Actions:

There appear to be no specie- specific conservation measures in place. It is not known whether this species occurs in any marine protected areas. Additional field surveys are needed to better understand the distribution of this deepwater species.

Classifications [top]

9. Marine Neritic -> 9.2. Marine Neritic - Subtidal Rock and Rocky Reefs
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes
9. Marine Neritic -> 9.8. Marine Neritic - Coral Reef -> 9.8.3. Foreslope (Outer Reef Slope)
suitability: Suitable  major importance:Yes

In-Place Research, Monitoring and Planning
In-Place Land/Water Protection and Management
  Occur in at least one PA:Unknown
In-Place Species Management
In-Place Education
5. Biological resource use -> 5.4. Fishing & harvesting aquatic resources -> 5.4.1. Intentional use: (subsistence/small scale)
♦ timing: Ongoing ♦ scope: Minority (<50%) ♦ severity: No decline ⇒ Impact score: Low Impact: 4 
→ Stresses
  • 2. Species Stresses -> 2.1. Species mortality

1. Research -> 1.2. Population size, distribution & trends

♦  Pets/display animals, horticulture
 International : ✓ 

Bibliography [top]

Allen, G.R., Steene, R. and Allen, M. 1998. A guide to angelfishes and butterflyfishes. Odyssey Publishing/Tropical Reef Research.

IUCN. 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (ver. 2010.4). Available at: (Accessed: 27 October 2010).

Lieske, E. and Myers, R. 1994. Collins Pocket Guide. Coral reef fishes. Indo-Pacific and Caribbean including the Red Sea. Harper Collins Publishers.

Pyle, R. 2001. Pomacanthidae: Angelfishes. In: K.E. Carpenter and V.H. Niem (eds), FAO species identification guide for fishery purposes. The living marine resources of the Western Central Pacific. Bony fishes part 3 (Menidae to Pomacentridae), pp. 3266-3286. FAO, Rome, Italy.

Pyle, R.L. and Randall, J.E. 1993. A new species of Centropyge from the Cook Islands, with a redescription of Centropyge boylei. Rev. Fr. Aquariol. 19(4): 115-124.

Citation: Pyle, R., Myers, R. & Craig, M.T. 2010. Centropyge boylei. In: The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2010: e.T165824A6142025. . Downloaded on 04 October 2015.
Disclaimer: To make use of this information, please check the <Terms of Use>.
Feedback: If you see any errors or have any questions or suggestions on what is shown on this page, please provide us with feedback so that we can correct or extend the information provided